Direct payments

direct payments

If you or someone you care for get help from social services, then you can apply for direct payments. These extra payments let you choose and buy the services you need yourself, instead of getting them from your council.

So, if you use a trained babysitter or 'respite carer' to babysit or do days out with your SEN or disabled child then you might be able to get a special budget to pay for it. This budget is called a direct payment.

The Assessment

You can only get direct payments if you’ve been assessed by your social services department. The assessments are usually done at home. A disability social worker will go through your day to day activities and put together a care plan detailing what you need.

Sometimes, you can find the assessment criteria for your local social services department online. It might be a good idea to 'Google it' and have a look through the document in advance to see if you might be eligible.

During the assessment, take notes of what is being said as well as the assessors contact details and name. You could always send your notes via email after the meeting and thank them for their time. That way, everybody feels like they're working together as a team.

Who are Direct Payments for?

You might be able to get Direct payments if you are a...

  • disabled person aged 16 or over (with short or long-term needs)
  • a disabled parent for children’s services
  • carers aged 16 or over including people with parental responsibility for a disabled child.
  • elderly people who need community care services

How do I Apply for Direct Payments?

To receive direct payments, you first need to contact your local council or trust to ask them to assess your care needs. How much you get depends on your financial circumstances, and you might need to top it up with money of your own. APPLY HERE for Direct Payments.

How do direct payments work?

Direct payments go straight into your bank, post office, building society or other savings account. The council have to agree in advance what you spend your personal budget on. This can be changes as your circumstances and needs change.

You might to be able to use direct payments for...

  • short breaks
  • help to go to a youth club or other activity
  • personal care

Remember that this is all about a partnership between you and the professionals involved to make the right decisions for you as a family.

 

Direct Payments are not automatic!

Call your social services department or disability social worker to talk through you options.

Sky Badger knows that finding help is tricky, so please look through Sky Badger's website to find even more support for your whole family.

The Good News...

Direct Payments can bring you more independence and choice in how you manage care.

  • you will take control of your own care and support services.
  • you will have more choice in selecting the services and support tailored to your needs.
  • If you're confident with money and paperwork this is definitely for you, if not, you can still get support.
  • If you're great at keeping receipts and invoices and love getting  reports and paperwork to your direct payment team on time.

The Not So Good News...

This might not be for you is...

  • you don't like the idea of being an employer – that's what direct payments require you to be.
  • you’re not goos at keeping records and receipts.
  • if you or the person you're caring for you spends frequent or long periods of time in hospital.
  • if you’re happy letting your local authority provide you with care services you need.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Personal Independence Payment

What is a P.I.P.?

The Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is a benefit that helps you with the extra costs of having a disability or having a long-term health conditions. It is for people aged 16 to 64. The PIP is not a means tested benefit.

You'll find a great step-by-step guide to filling in the form on this page. Scroll down to the end of the page for lots more information about how to apply, how to appeal a decision and find lots of other organisations that can help you with your PIP application process.

Children under 16

You can’t make a claim for PIP for children under 16. For existing DLA for child claims the DWP will contact you  when your child is 15 years and 7 months old.

PIP Allowance

If you’re aged 16 to 64 you could get between £23.60 and £151.40 a week by claiming Personal Independence Payment (PIP). The amount you get depends on how your condition affects you, not the condition itself.

personal independence payment phone number

Telephone: 0800 917 2222
Textphone: 0800 917 7777
Calling from abroad: +44 191 218 7766
Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm

How is it Scored?

How does the PIP get scored and how many points do you need?

PIP is made up of 2 parts, the daily living component and the mobility component. Each component can be paid at one of 2 rates, either the standard rate or the enhanced rate. You need at least 8 points to get the standard rate or 12 points to get the enhanced rate of PIP. You will qualify for one of these if  you need is great enough. The 'points' in each section range from 0-12 depending on the severity of need.

Component Weekly rate
Daily living - standard rate £59.70
Daily living - enhanced rate £89.15
Mobility - standard rate £23.60
Mobility - enhanced rate £62.25

In our step-by step guide below, you'll find charts explaining how the points are awarded.

pip

How to claim PIP

You can make a new Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claim by calling the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). Someone else can call on your behalf, but you’ll need to be with them when they call. There are also other ways to claim if you find it difficult to use a telephone. The process is different in Northern Ireland.

Appointees

If a person can’t do things like tell the DWP if their condition gets better or worse, or about changes in address or bank details and so on, another person may need to act on their behalf, as their ‘Appointee’. This must be because of their illness or disability and not just because they are still a young person. Chat to the DWP on the number below to set someone else up as an appointee.

Claim by calling:

Telephone: 0345 850 3322
Textphone: 0345 601 6677

Before you call, you’ll need:

  • your contact details, for example telephone number
  • your date of birth
  • your National Insurance number - this is on letters about tax, pensions and benefits
  • your bank or building society account number and sort code
  • your doctor or health worker’s name, address and telephone number
  • dates and addresses for any time you’ve spent abroad, in a care home or hospital

Carers are currently providing care worth £132 billion...which is the same as the entire NHS budget!

How do I fill in the form?

A Step-by-Step Guide to Filling in your Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Form

As soon as your form arrives, put on the kettle and work through our guide. It does take ages but we'll do our best to help you one question at a time.

personal independence payment

PIP Q.1 - List all the professionals that you see because of your conditions.

These can include your GP, hospital doctor, specialists nurse, community psychiatric nurse, occupational therapist, teachers, SENco, educational psychologist, physiotherapist, social worker, counsellor, or support worker. Say when you last saw them and include their contact details.

PIP Q2. Conditions & Medications

PIP Q2a - List all of your physical and mental health conditions and disabilities and say when they were diagnosis. If you’re not sure, just put down the year.

PIP Q2b - List all of the medications you’re taking and at what dose. Include any treatments you’re having or will be having and any side effects they have on you.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

...and while you're working hard on your PIP application, we wondered if there is anything else we can tell you about?

PIP Q3 - Preparing Food

This question is about if you can prepare a meal for yourself. Can you do things like peeling, chopping or opening packaging? Can you use a hob, oven or microwave oven safely?

PIP Q3a – What other help from an aid or appliance do you need to prepare and cook a simple meal for yourself? Do you need things like perching stools, lightweight pots and pans, easy grip handles on utensils, single lever arm taps and liquid level indicators?

PIP Q3b - Do you need help from another person to prepare or cook a simple meal?
Do they remind you or motivate you to cook? Do they plan the task for you? Do they supervise you, help you physically or do they prepare all your food for you?

PIP Q3c - Extra information - Preparing Food

Write down anything else about how you find preparing food tricky because of your condition. How are you managing now? How long does preparing a meal take? What help do you need? Is it safe for you to cook? Are you in pain or do you get tired?

 

Preparing Food Points
Can prepare and cook a simple meal unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal. 2
Cannot cook a simple meal using a conventional cooker but is able to do so using a microwave. 2
Needs prompting to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. For example: you lack motivation to prepare and cook a simple meal on the majority of days due to a mental health condition, or need to be reminded how to prepare and cook food on the majority of days. 2
Needs supervision or assistance to either prepare or cook a simple meal. You may need supervision to safely heat or cook food using a microwave oven; or to claimants who cannot safely prepare vegetables, even with an aid or appliance. In cases of a risk of self-harm, there should be good evidence of the risk. 4
Cannot prepare and cook food. 8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q4 - Eating and drinking

This question is about how you eat and drink because of you condition(s).

Do you remember to Eat? Do you need help cutting up your food? Can you put food and drink into your own mouth and can you chew and swallow?

PIP Q4a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to eat and drink - like weighted cups or adapted cutlery?

PIP Q4b – Do you use a feeding tube or similar device to eat or drink - like a feeding tube with a rate limiting device as a delivery system or feed pump?

PIP Q4c – Do you need help from another person to eat and drink? Does someone have to remind or encourage you to eat? Do they supervise you? Do they physically help you to eat and drink or do they manage your feeding tube?

PIP Q4d - Extra information - Eating and drinking

 

Eating and drinking Points
Can take nutrition unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to take nutrition; or ii. supervision to be able to take nutrition; or assistance to be able to cut up food. 2
Needs a therapeutic source to be able to take nutrition. You may require enteral or parenteral feeding but can carry it out unaided. 2
Needs prompting to be able to take nutrition. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. 4
Needs assistance to be able to manage a therapeutic source to take nutrition. 6
Cannot convey food and drink to their mouth and needs another person to do so. 10

 

PIP Q5 – Managing treatments

This section is about how tricky you find it to manage your treatments, monitor your condition and stop yourself getting worse. That might include monitoring your blood sugar level or noticing changes in mental state and pain levels.

Q5a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to monitor your health conditions or take medication or manage home treatments? E.g. Do you use a Dosette Box for tablets.

Q5b – Do you need help from another person to remind you to take medications and treatment? Does someone supervise you while you take your medication? Do they physically help you take medication or manage treatments?

Q5c – Extra information - Managing treatments. Chat about the good days and the bad ones. Do you have any side effects that make managing your medication tricky?

 

Managing treatments Points
Does not receive medication or therapy or need to monitor a health condition; or can manage medication or therapy or monitor a health condition unaided. 0
Needs either to use an aid or appliance to be able to manage medication; or supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage medication or monitor a health condition. Eg. You might need help opening bottles or taking pills out of blister packs; help interpreting or reading blood sugar for the correct dose of medication; supervision to ensure the medication is taken properly; prompting to remind the claimant to take medication at the appropriate time(s). 1
Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes no more than 3.5 hours a week. 2
Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 3.5 but no more than 7 hours a week. 4
Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 7 but no more than 14 hours a week. 6
Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 14 hours a week. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. For example, a claimant needs 15 minutes of assistance with therapy each day Monday to Friday, or reminding to manage 8
disabled council tax and disabled bills

PIP Q6 – Washing and bathing

How does you condition affect you taking a bath or showering? Can you wash your body, limbs, face, underarms and hair and can you use a standard bath or shower?

Q6a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to wash and bathe yourself, including using a bath or shower? Aids and appliances include things like a bath / shower seat or grab rails.

Q6b – Do you need help from another person to wash and bathe? Do they physically help you? Do they remind you when to wash and bathe and do they watch over you to make sure you are safe?

Q6c – Extra information - Washing and bathing

Tell us more about any difficulties you have when washing and bathing like risks including accidents a safety, the time it takes and if you have pain, breathlessness or get really tired.

 

 

Washing and bathing Points
Can wash and bathe unaided. You can wash and bath unaided, including getting in to and out of both an unadapted bath and unadapted shower. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to wash or bathe. E.g. a long-handled sponge, shower seat or bath rail. 2
Needs supervision or prompting to be able to wash or bathe. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. 2
Needs assistance to be able to wash either their hair, or body below the waist. 2
Needs assistance to be able to get in or out of a bath or shower. 3
Needs assistance to be able to wash their body between the shoulders and waist. 4
Cannot wash and bathe at all and needs another person to wash their entire body. 8

 

PIP Q7 – Managing toilet needs

 

Talk about if  you can get on or off a standard toilet, and clean yourself after using the toilet. Can you manage emptying your bowel and bladder? Do you need a collecting device such as a bottle, bucket or catheter?

PIP Q7a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to use the toilet or manage incontinence like commodes, raised toilet seats, bottom wipers, bidets, incontinence pads or a stoma bag?

PIP Q7b – Do you need help from another person to use the toilet or manage incontinence? Do they physically help you? Do they remind you when to use the toilet or do they watch over you to make sure you are safe?

PIP Q7c – Extra information - Managing toilet needs

Say how long it takes you to complete this activity. Is it different day to day? Tell them about good and bad days. Are you incontinent? How you manage it?

 

Managing toilet needs Points
Can manage toilet needs or incontinence unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to manage toilet needs or incontinence. 2
Needs supervision or prompting to be able to manage toilet needs. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. 2
Needs assistance to be able to manage toilet needs. E.g. If you require assistance to get on and off the toilet and/or to clean themselves afterwards, but 4
Needs assistance to be able to manage incontinence of either bladder or bowel. 6
Needs assistance to be able to manage incontinence of both bladder and bowel. 8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q8 – Dressing and undressing

In this section, you can talk about how your condition affects you putting on and taking off clothes, including shoes and socks. Do you know when to put on or take off clothes, and can you choose clothes that are appropriate?

PIP Q8a – Do you use an aid or appliance to dress or undress like modified buttons, front fastening bras, velcro fastening, shoe aids or an audio colour detector?

PIP Q8b – Do you need help from another person to dress or undress? Do they physically help you? Do they select your clothes for the weather, the occasion or the time of day? Do they tell you when to dress and undress or do they remind you when to change your clothes?

PIP Q8c – Extra Information - Dressing and undressing

Add anything here that helps explain how else your condition affects you doing this activity like how long it takes you to dress and undress or if only have difficulty dressing certain parts of your body?

Dressing and undressing Points
Can dress and undress unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to dress or undress. E.g. modified buttons and shoe aids. 2
Needs either prompting to be able to dress, undress or determine appropriate circumstances for remaining clothed; or prompting or assistance to be able to select appropriate clothing. 2
Needs assistance to be able to dress or undress their lower body. 2
Needs assistance to be able to dress or undress their upper body. 4
Cannot dress or undress at all. 8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q9 – Communicating

How does your condition affect you communicating? That includes your speech, hearing or how you understand what is being said to you. (In your native language).

 

PIP Q9a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to communicate with others like a hearing and voice aids, picture symbols or other assistive computer technology?

PIP Q9b – Do you need help from another person to communicate with others?
Do they help you understand what people are saying? Do you have someone who helps you by interpreting speech into sign language or do they help you by speaking on your behalf?

PIP Q9c – Extra information - Communicating

Mention it here if you have Tourette’s syndrome, Asperger’s or autism and find it difficult to communicate or if your medication has side effects that make it difficult to communicate. Does communicating cause anxiety and distress?

Communicating Points
Can express and understand verbal information unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to speak or hear. E.g. You might require a hearing aid or an electro larynx. 2
Needs communication support to be able to express or understand complex verbal information. E.g. You may require a sign language interpreter. 4
Needs communication support to be able to express or understand basic verbal information. E.g. You may require a sign language interpreter. 8
Cannot express or understand verbal information at all even with communication support. 12


 

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

PIP Q10 – Reading

This section is about how you read normal sized text and understand signs, symbols and words (in your native language). You should also talk about if you have problems concentrating when you read. Talk about how you read and understand signs, symbols and words written or printed in your native language, not braille. How you understanding numbers, including dates and other day to day reading like timetables.

PIP Q10a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance other than spectacles or contact lenses to read signs, symbols and words like magnifiers or need to take breaks?

PIP Q10b – Do you need help from another person to read or understand signs, symbols and words? Does somebody else need to read or explain signs and symbols to you because you have a learning disability or a mental health problem?

PIP Q10c – Extra information - Reading

Write about how how your condition affects your writing. How long does it take you to write a letter?

Reading Points
Can read and understand basic and complex written information either unaided or using spectacles or contact lenses. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance, other than spectacles or contact lenses, to be able to read or understand either basic or complex written information. E.g. You may require vision aids. 2
Needs prompting to be able to read or understand complex written information. 2
Needs prompting to be able to read or understand basic written information. 4
Cannot read or understand signs, symbols or words at all. E.g. You may require another person to read everything for them due to a learning disability or severe visual impairment. 8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q11 – Mixing with other people

This question is about how you get on with other people face-to-face, either individually or as part of a group. Do you understand how they're behaving towards you, and can you behave appropriately towards them?

PIP Q11a – Do you need another person to help you to mix with other people? Does someone else need to encourage you to mix with other people? Does someone help you understand how people are behaving and how to behave yourself because you have a learning disability or mental heath problem?

PIP Q11b – Do you find it difficult or stressful to meet other people?

PIP Q11c – Extra information - Mixing with other people

Explain any stress, anxiety or confusion you feel around meeting people. Do you need help to stay safe? Do you have good days and bad ones? How do they differ?

Mixing with other people Points
Can engage with other people unaided. 0
Needs prompting to be able to engage with other people. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. For example: may apply to people who need encouragement to engage with others in the presence of a third party. 2
Needs social support to be able to engage with other people. 4
Cannot engage with other people due to such engagement causing either –

i. overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant; or ii. the claimant to exhibit behaviour which would result in a substantial risk of harm to the claimant or another person. ‘Overwhelming psychological distress’ means distress related to an enduring mental health condition or intellectual or cognitive impairment which results in a severe anxiety state in which the symptoms are so severe that the person is unable to function. This may occur in conditions such as generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, dementia or agoraphobia.

8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q12 – Making decisions about money

This section is about how you manage money. Do you understand how much things costs? How much change you should get and how to manage budgets? Can you understand how to pay bills and plan?

PIP Q12a – Do you need someone else to help you to understand how much things cost when you buy them or how much change you'll receive? Do you need someone to do it for you or do they need to remind you to do it or how to do it? Do you need someone to help you understand?

PIP Q12b – Do you need someone else to help you manage your household budgets, pay bills or plan future purchases? Do you need someone to do it for you or do they have to help you manage your bills? Do you need encouragement and help to do it?

PIP Q12c – Extra information - Making decisions about money

How your condition affects you understanding money? Do you have a learning disability that makes understanding money difficult?

 Making decisions about money Points
Can manage complex budgeting decisions unaided. 0
Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make complex budgeting decisions. 2
Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make simple budgeting decisions. 4
Cannot make any budgeting decisions at all. 6

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q13 – Going out

This section is about how your condition makes it tricky to go out. That includes how to plan and follow a route, follow a train and bus timetable or if you have severe anxiety or stress prevents you from going out.

PIP Q13a – Do you need help from another person to plan a route to somewhere you know well? Do you need someone to help you plan a route, or plan it for you? Do you have an assistance dog or specialist aid, such as a white stick? Do you find it difficult or stressful to handle change? Do you have a mental condition that makes travelling difficult? Do you need somebody with you to stay safe?

PIP Q13b – Do you need help getting to somewhere you don't know well?

Just like in the previous question about travelling to a familiar place this question asks about the same challenges but for an unfamiliar place. Is an unfamiliar journey different in terms of the challenges it presents to you?

PIP Q13c – Are you unable to go out because of severe anxiety or distress?

PIP Q13d – Extra information - Going out

Talk about tell us how your condition affects you going out if you. Talk about any orientation aids you use. Do you have good days and bad days? Do you feel anxious, fearful or nervous? Are you at risk of accidents, injury or do you get lost?

 Going out Points
Can plan and follow the route of a journey unaided. 0
Needs prompting to be able to undertake any journey to avoid overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant. ‘Overwhelming psychological distress’ means distress related to an enduring mental health condition or intellectual or cognitive impairment which results in a severe anxiety state in which the symptoms are so severe that the person is 4
For reasons other than psychological distress, cannot plan the route of a journey. 8
For reasons other than psychological distress, cannot follow the route of an unfamiliar journey without another person, assistance dog or orientation aid. 10 points. 10
Cannot undertake any journey because it would cause overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant. 10
For reasons other than psychological distress, cannot follow the route of a familiar journey without another person, an assistance dog or an orientation aid. 12

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q14 – Moving around

This question is about you standing safely without help and if you can walk safely

PIP Q14a – How far can you walk taking into account any aids you use? To give you an idea of distance, 50 metres is approximately 5 buses parked end to end.

PIP Q14b – Do you use an aid or appliance to walk? Walking aids include walking sticks, walking frames, crutches, and prostheses.

PIP Q14c – Do you use a wheelchair or similar device to move around safely, reliably and repeatedly and in a reasonable time period?

PIP Q14d – Extra information - Moving Around

Talk about any aids you use, rest breaks you need, pain, the time it takes to move around, accidents and other risks. Do you need someone to help you? Do you regularly fall? Do you find it difficult to move around on certain ground surfaces? Do you use a wheelchair? Is it motorised or manual? Do you experience any other difficulties, either during or after the activity, like pain, breathlessness, tiredness, dizziness or anxiety?

Moving around Points
Can stand and then move more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided. 0
Can stand and then move more than 50 metres but no more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided. For example, this would include people who can stand and move more than 50 metres but no further than 200 metres either by themselves, or using an aid or appliance such as a stick or crutch, or with support from another person. 4
Can stand and then move unaided more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres. For example, this would include people who can stand and move more than 20 metres but no further than 50 metres, without needing to rely on an aid or appliance such as a walking stick, or help from another person. 8
Can stand and then move using an aid or appliance more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres. For example, this would include people who can stand and move more than 20 metres but no further than 50 metres, but need to use an aid or appliance, such as a stick or crutch to do so. 10
Can stand and then move more than 1 metre but no more than 20 metres, either aided or unaided. For example, a person who can stand and move more than 1 metre, but no further than 20 metres, either unaided or with the use of an aid or appliance such as a stick or crutch, or support from another person. 12
Cannot, either aided or unaided – i. stand; or ii. move more than 1 metre. 12

 

PIP Q15 – Additional information

This page is blank. Add any more information in here or on a separate page with your name and national insurance number at the top.

Add any reports from you family or carers here too....and that's just about it! You've definitely learnt another cup of tea.

 

Top Tips...

  • Get all of your professional reports as early as possible.
  • If you use information in the reports to give evidence of need in your form, then reference it and highlight relevant sections in the reports when you attache them.
  • If you're not confident hand writing your form, don't worry. You can answer pretty much everything by using separate pieces of paper that you attach to the form. Remember you MUST put the claimant's name and national insurance number at the top of each page.
  • Photocopy everything! You don't want to have to do the whole thing again.

When you've finished your form, post it off in the envelope provided.

You’ll then probably have to have an assessment to complete your Personal Independence Payment (PIP) application. This will be a meeting with a health professional who will write a report and send it to the DWP. You need to prepare for the meeting in advance. Happily, there's a fabulous guide from Citizens Advice HERE that will help you prepare.

DWP's intro to PIP's

This website includes an overview, details about eligibility, what you'll get, how to claim and what to do if your circumstances change.

Citizens Advice Bureau - PIP Language

This guide to the language used in the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessment criteria. Whether you can get PIP depends on an assessment of your ability to carry out certain daily living activities and mobility activities. This is measured against a list of descriptors, which describe varying levels of ability under each activity.

Challenging a PIP decision

A CAB guide to appealing against the decision made about your PIP claim.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Personal Budgets

Personal Budgets

What is a Personal Budget?

Personal budgets are an amount of money given by your Local Authority to provide support that’s been identified in your child’s Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP).

The personal budget is used to help your child’s individual needs and help them live more independent lives. You may be able to use it so a carer can take your child to Scouts, the cinema, out shopping, to help with personal care or to come along with you and help you while on holiday.

How do I get a Personal Budget for my Child?

Contact your Local Authority’s disability social worker team to get the ball rolling or ask to speak to someone at your LA who deals specifically with direct payments. Your local Authority will then carry out a needs assessment to get a clear picture of what your individual family needs.

Before your assessment think about...

  • What sort of help do you need?
  • How does your child’s disability/health affect them and your wholefamily?
  • What are you having trouble with at the moment?
  • How could your child have more control over their life?
  • Do your/their needs change?
  • How much help do you need and how often?
  • What do you imagine could change if you had the help?

You could ask for help to do the following...

  • Getting in or out of bed, washing, toileting, dressing
  • Playing outdoors, clubs, leisure or educational activities.
  • Shopping
  • Respite care or short breaks
  • Cooking
  • Socialising including going to events or places of worship

Top tips...

  • Find out what your local council’ s assessment criteria is before your first meeting.
  • Take notes during the assessment.
  • Ask what help your LA gives in order to manage your budget.

 Different ways to Manage your Personal Budget

Your Local Authority will give you loads of information and help about what options they offer and which way or combinations of ways you can get your direct payments.

Direct payments – your local council pays some or all of your budget into a bank account managed by you or someone else who will manage the budget for you like a broker.

An account managed by the council...indirect payments – the council will manage your budget and will sort out services on your behalf.

As an Individual Service Fund (ISF) – Your local authority pays an organization that provides support services and will follow your instructions in getting the services you need. You have a say as to how this support is provided.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Sports for Disabled & Autistic Children

disabled sports, disabled clubs

On this page you'll find tonnes of exciting new sports for your special needs or disabled child to try.

From archery to water skiing, there is a huge range of sports that a disabled child can take part in. Whether they just want a bit of fun exercise, or have ambitions to be a future Paralympian, these links will help you find something exciting for them. We also have links to governing bodies in our directory – they should be able to put you in touch with a local club so you can try something new.

Disabled Sports and more

There are so many sports to try out whatever your child's interests or needs are. Don't forget to check out our other Sky Badger's guides to finding funding for sports kit and adventure holidays.

On this page, you'll find disabled sports clubs, funding for equipment and local clubs to get in touch with.

football

Find...

  • disabled sports clubs
  • wheelchair sports
  • blind sport
  • wheelchair basketball
  • adaptive skiing
  • disabled cycling
  • wheelchair rugby
  • disabled football
  • wheelchair tennis
  • disability netball
  • English federation of disability sport
  • Sailability
  • Accessible mountain biking
  • Riding for the disabled
  • Disabled flying
  • And much more!

Top 5 Sky Badger Sports to Try...

The RYA Sailability

The national body for all forms of disabled boating, including dinghy and yacht racing, motor and sail cruising, RIBs and sports boats, powerboat racing, windsurfing, inland cruising and narrowboats, and personal watercraft.

Flying!

Aerobility is a registered charity founded in 1993 offering disabled people, without exception, the opportunity to fly an aeroplane. For some, just that amazing first flight is enough to change their outlook on disability forever.

MOUNTAIN BIKING

Authentic mountain bike experiences for disabled riders with a range of abilities.

Wheelchair Rugby

Find a club near you

Boom!

Horse Riding

Riding for the Disabled

Find lots more sports to try here!

Click here to see the Sky Badger Sports directory.

You should also check out the Sky Badger website to find holidays, clubs, grants and much more.

Local Sports Clubs

Click the button below to find your local offer. The Local Offer is a directory that your Local Authority has. It lists all the help and support that you might need to help your disabled or special needs child. You'll find all the disabled and special needs sports clubs listed there.

Local Offer

Click here to find clubs near you.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Disabled Child Tax Credits

On this page you’ll find tonnes of information about the extra amount you should be getting if your child is disabled and you get child tax credits. 

This is not an automatic payment, so you must let the Child Tax Office know if you think you're eligible.

Don’t forget to check out our other Sky Badger pages to find out about other benefits for disabled children as well as grants, respite care and much more.

Quick Links

If you want to jump straight to the section that's relevant for you then use these quick links.

Child Tax Credits

What is the Disability Child Tax Credit?

You’ll already be getting child tax credits if you have a child under 16 or under 20 in eligible education or training. If your child is disabled, you should be getting extra help.

You may get extra Child Tax Credits if your child either gets Disability Living Allowance or PIPs.

What is the Disabled Child Element?

The disabled child element is an extra amount that is added into your child tax credits award.

The disabled child rate

A child or young person qualifies for the disabled child rate if they get:

  • any other rate of DLA or PIP or
    are certified as severely sight impaired or blind by a consultant ophthalmologist, or have ceased to be so certified in the past 28 weeks.

The severely disabled child rate 

A child or young person qualifies for the severely disabled child rate if they get:

  • DLA highest rate care component
  • PIP enhanced rate daily living component
Personal Budgets

Contact A Family

Guide to Tax Credits

Revenue Benefits

Understanding Tax Credits

Qualifying for the Disability Component

To qualify for the extra disability component, your child must….

       The disabled child rate

        A child or young person qualifies for             the disabled child rate if they get...

  • any other rate of DLA or PIP or
  • are certified as severely sight impaired or blind by a consultant ophthalmologist, or have ceased to be so certified in the past 28 weeks.

    The severely disabled child rate

    A child or young person qualifies for the severely disabled child rate if they get...

  • DLA highest rate care component
  • PIP enhanced rate daily living component

Does it matter how much I earn?

Your income will affect how much Tax Credit you get. Contact the Tax Credit advice line to check out where you stand.

Boy in the theme of  summer time .

Disabled Child Tax Credits Rates & Entitlements

This comes in two parts, the disabled child rate and the severely disabled child rate.

Disabled Child Tax Credits Weekly Rates

Disabled Child Rate £60
Severely Disabled Child Rate £24 (additional)

How do I Apply?

YOU HAVE TO TELL THE TAX CREDIT OFFICE YOURSELF!

You won’t get this extra payment automatically so give them a ring now....

 

Contact: Tax Credits Office 0345 300 3900.

Other things that might help you…

You should also check out the Sky Badger website to see if you can claim carer’s allowance, young carer’s support, help with your bills, Council tax reductions and much more.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Carers Allowance

On this page you’ll find tonnes of information about Carer's Allowance. What is Carer's Allowance, How much is Carer's Allowance, find out if you're eligible and how to apply. You can also find out about Carer's Credit so your NI payments stay up to date.

Don’t forget to check out our other Sky Badger pages to find out about other benefits for disabled children as well as grants, respite care and much more.

What is Carer's Allowance?

If you spend 35 hours a week or more caring for a child who gets the middle or higher rate care component DLA then you might be eligible you Caller’s Allowance. You don’t have to be related to, or live with, the child or young person you care for but you won’t be paid extra if you care for more than one disabled child.

Contact the Carer’s Allowance Unit

Telephone: 0345 608 4321

Textphone: 0345 604 5312

Monday to Thursday, 8:30am to 5pm

Friday, 8:30am to 4:30pm

carers allowance

Carers UK

More guides and information.

Turn 2 Us

More information.

Qualifying for Carer's Allowance

Your child must already get one of these benefits...

  • Personal Independence Payment - daily living component
  • Disability Living Allowance - the middle or highest care rate
  • Attendance Allowance
  • Constant Attendance Allowance at or above the normal maximum rate with an Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit

You might be able to get Carer’s Allowance if...

  • you’re 16 or over
  • you spend at least 35 hours a week caring for someone
  • have been in England, Scotland or Wales for at least 2 of the last 3 years
  • you normally live in England, Scotland or Wales, or you live abroad as a member of the armed forces
  • you’re not in full-time education
  • you’re not studying for 21 hours a week or more
  • you earn no more than £110 a week (after taxes, care costs while you’re at work and 50% of what you pay into your pension) - don’t count your pension as income
  • you’re not subject to immigration control

You might still be eligible if you’re moving to or already living in another EEA country. The rules are different in Northern Ireland.

Effect on the benefits of the person you care for...

When you claim Carer’s Allowance, the person you care for will stop getting:

  • a severe disability premium paid with their benefits
  • an extra amount for severe disability paid with Pension Credit, if they get one
  • Reduced Council Tax - contact their local council to find out if this affects them

Effect on your benefits

When you claim Carer’s Allowance your other benefits may be reduced, but your total benefit payments will usually either go up or stay the same.

Carer’s Allowance doesn’t count towards the benefit cap.

If you get Working Tax Credit or Child Tax Credit, you must contact the Tax Credits office to tell them about Carer’s Allowance claim.

Use a benefits calculator to work out how your other benefits will be affected.

Carer's Allowance Rates & Entitlements

Personal Budgets

Carer's Credit

You could get Carer’s Credit if you’re caring for someone for at least 20 hours a week.

Carer’s Credit is a National Insurance credit that helps with gaps in your National Insurance record. Your State Pension is based on your National Insurance record.

Your income, savings or investments won’t affect eligibility for Carer’s Credit.

What you'll get...

If you’re eligible for Carer’s Credit, you can get credits to help fill gaps in your National Insurance record.

This means you can take on caring responsibilities without affecting your ability to qualify for the State Pension.

Eligibility

To get Carer’s Credit you must be:

  • aged 16 or over
  • under State Pension age
  • looking after one or more people for at least 20 hours a week

The person you’re looking after must get one of the following:

  • Disability Living Allowance care component at the middle or highest rate
  • Attendance Allowance
  • Constant Attendance Allowance

If the person you’re caring for doesn’t get one of these benefits, you may still be able to get Carer’s Credit. When you apply, fill in the ‘Care Certificate’ part of the application form and get a health or social care professional to sign it.

Carers who don’t qualify for Carer’s Allowance may qualify for Carer’s Credit.

Breaks in caring and eligibility

You can still get Carer’s Credit even if you have breaks from caring (up to 12 weeks in a row).

For example, you’ll still get Carer’s Credit for 12 weeks if:

  • you take a short holiday
  • someone you look after goes into hospital
  • you go into hospital

Keep the Carer’s Allowance Unit updated if you have a break in caring of more than 12 weeks in a row.

Other things Carer's Allowance allows you to apply for…

You’ll automatically get National Insurance credits. You might also be able to apply for support from your local council and a Council Tax Reduction.

See Sky Badger's Finance pages for more information on benefits, grants and much more.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for Children

DLA

On this page you’ll find tonnes of information about the Disability Living Allowance for children under 16 (DLA). Don’t forget to check out our other Sky Badger pages to find out about other benefits for disabled children as well as grants, respite care and much more.

Quick Links

If you want to jump straight to the section that's relevant for you then use these quick links.

What is Disability Living Allowance (DLA)?

Disability living allowance is the main benefit for disabled children under 16. DLA is designed to help you cover the extra costs that you might face because of your child’s disability. The range of levels is wide, from a little extra help for children with learning disabilities to severe disability both mentally and physically.

What’s really important to remember about the DLA, is that it is about how much extra care and support your child needs not what their diagnosis is. In fact even if your child doesn’t have a diagnosis yet, you can still claim DLA. You will of course need good evidence of how their needs impact them day to day life. The key issue is that they have extra needs that other children their age don’t have.

To claim DLA, you have to fill in this form BUT please read the rest of this article first before you start!

The Disability Living Allowance helpline...

DLA Rates & Entitlements

DLA comes in two parts, the Care and Mobility components. Here are the current DLA rates:

Care Component Weekly Rates

Lowest £23.60
Middle £59.70
Highest £89.15

Mobility Component Weekly Rates

Lower £23.60
Higher £62.25

Mobility & Care components

Care Component

This part is designed for children that need extra help day to day including their personal care. It comes at three levels. For the lower level, your child will need at least 1 extra hour of help in 24 hours. For the higher rates, your child will need help both day and night care.

Lowest rate - help for some of the day or night

Middle rate - frequent help or constant supervision during the day, supervision at night or someone to help while they’re on dialysis

Highest rate - help or supervision throughout both day and night, or they’re terminally ill

Mobility Component

This part is designed to help your child if they have trouble getting around. It comes at two levels of support, lower rate and higher rate.

Low rate mobility DLA

If your child needs lots of extra help in getting around and staying safe but isn’t necessarily physically disabled, then your child might qualify for the lower rate. You’ll need to be really specific about what this extra help is.

Higher rate mobility DLA

 High rate criteria…

  • unable to walk
  • virtually unable to walk
  • the exertion required to walk would constitute a danger to their life or would be likely to lead to a serious deterioration in their health
  • have no legs or feet (from birth or through amputation)
  • severely mentally impaired and show extremely disruptive and dangerous behaviour
  • or have a severe visual impairment; or be both blind and deaf and need the assistance of another person to walk out of doors.

 

Children with Autism and DLA

Children who don’t necessarily have a physical disability but need extra “guidance or supervision” to help them get around may be eligible for the lower rate. However, some children with Autism could also qualify for higher rate depending on their specific needs.

To be eligible for the higher rate, your child must have ‘a severe mental impairment and behavioural problems’ or be ‘virtually unable to walk’.

These phases are horrid but they are only words so please don’t take it to heart. This is after all about getting the help your child needs to allow them to live as full a life as possible.

More detailed advice about applying for DLA for an Autism Child

There are a couple of fab guides that we’ve linked to here that will help you work through your application for DLA if your child has learning disabilities or Autism…

Contact A Family

Guide to DLA

Tips for Parents

National Autistic Society Guide

Qualifying for DLA

To qualify for DLA your child must….

  • be under 16
  • need extra looking after or have walking difficulties
  • be in Great Britain, another European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland when you claim - there are some exceptions, such as family members of the Armed Forces
  • have lived in Great Britain for 2 of the last 3 years, if over 3 years old
  • be habitually resident in the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man or the Channel Islands
  • not be subject to immigration control
  • There are some exceptions to these conditions if the child is living or coming from another EEA country or Switzerland.

How old does my child need to be?

This depends on lots of things but you can get higher rate mobility for your child from the age of 3 and the lower rate from the age of 5. There is not a set lower age limit for the carer’s component. However If your child has a life-limiting condition, DLA is payable for the age of 3 months.

What about my income & savings

DLA is NOT MEANS TESTED. So your income and savings don’t matter at all and are not relevant in your child being eligible for this benefit.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

A Step-by-Step Guide to filling out the DLA Form

Click here to get a guide on each question, terminology used and some excellent top tips!

It costs three times more to raise a disabled child as it does to raise a non-disabled child….

So find your child a grant and other help here!

Other things DLA allows you to apply for…

If you qualify for DLA higher rate mobility, then you can also use the Motability Scheme and automatically qualify for a Blue Badge from your Local Authority. You should also check out the Sky Badger website to see if you can claim carer’s allowance, young carer’s support, help with your bills, Council tax reductions and much more.

DLA and how it affects other benefits

Getting DLA can lead to an increase in other benefits or help you qualify for other entitlements. Even if you get DLA for your child already, you may find that getting an increased rate will lead to something else.

The following is a checklist of benefits and entitlements which may become available following an award or increase of DLA.;-

Carer‘s Allowance (CA)

If your child gets the middle or the highest rate of the DLA care component, you may be able to get Carer’s Allowance (CA). You must be caring for your child for at least 35 hours of each week. To get CA, you must not be treated as a full-time student and not earning more than a set amount, after certain deductions.

Carer’s Allowance can be backdated in line with the DLA award, as long as you apply within three months of getting the DLA decision. If you apply later, Carer’s Allowance can only be backdated for three months.

CA can affect entitlements like Income Support and tax credits. In most cases you will still be better off. If you get Incapacity Benefit, or contributory Employment and Support Allowance, it could also be in your interest to apply for CA, even though it can’t be paid on top of these benefits.

Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Child Tax Credit is assessed more generously when a child gets DLA. Families will qualify for an extra disability element (and a severe disability element if your child is on the highest rate DLA care component). The disability and severe disability elements can be backdated in line with the DLA award if you tell the tax credit office within one month of a decision to award DLA.

If you have previously been refused or never claimed tax credits because your income was too high, you may find that you qualify for the first time as a result of your child being awarded DLA (or having their care component increased to the highest rate.

Income Support (IS)

For families still getting payments for their children in their IS, getting DLA will lead to extra money being added to your IS, known as a disabled child premium (and an enhanced disability premium if your child is awarded the highest rate of the care component).

You will need to let the office dealing with the IS claim know about the DLA award.

If your child gets Employment and Support Allowance in their own right, an award of the highest rate of the care component of DLA may lead to an increase in this benefit. Let the office dealing with these benefits  know about a new award of DLA or any change to the existing award.

If your child gets Income Support in their own right, then an award of DLA can lead to an increase in their benefit. This is because they will qualify for the disability premium (and the enhanced disability premium if they’re awarded the highest rate of the care component).

Help with rent and council tax If you get Housing Benefit or support with council tax, then getting DLA for your child may lead to extra benefit if you are not already getting your rent and council tax met in full. If you don’t get these benefits but are liable for rent or council tax then you may find that getting DLA will help you qualify for the first time. If your disabled child cannot share a

bedroom and because of this your Housing Benefit is reduced under the bedroom tax or local housing allowance rules, getting DLA care component at the middle or highest rate for them may help you get more Housing Benefit.

Both Housing Benefit and support with council tax are means-tested and any award will depend on your income and circumstances.

There are other ways of getting help with council tax which don’t depend on income or savings but do depend on there being a disabled occupant within your household.

Universal Credit

Universal Credit is a new benefit that will replace tax credits and other means-tested benefits for people of working age. If you receive Universal Credit and a child who is included in your Universal Credit claim gets DLA, you will qualify for extra Universal Credit payments.

In most parts of the UK Universal Credit does not yet apply to families with a disabled child. However, families with a disabled child will be asked to claim Universal Credit if they live in a postcode area where the full Universal Credit service has been introduced and they try to make a new claim for one of the means-tested benefits or tax credits that Universal Credit is replacing, At the time of writing the full Universal Credit service only applies in a small number of postcode areas in England and Scotland, however it will gradually be extended to many more areas and is expected to cover the whole country soon.

Things to be aware of that may affect your DLA Claim….

Going into hospital or a care home

DLA can be affected by your child having overnight stays away from home. There are different rules for this depending on whether your child goes into hospital or a care home.

Stays in hospital

If your child is under 18 when they enter hospital, their DLA can continue to be paid for the whole time they are there.

Stays in a care home

If your child is in a care home (which usually includes residential schools), generally payment of the care component will stop after 28 days. However, they can be paid the care component for any day they stay in your home, including the day they leave and the day they return. The mobility component is not affected by stays in a care home. The rules differ if your child’s stay in a care home is funded by NHS continuing healthcare, or if you pay for the care home yourself.

Other DLA Advice...

1zr3wnstnvy-aaron-burden

Disability Rights

Information on the DLA

Contact A Family

DLA for children with learning difficulties

Parents & Carers Tips

The National Autistic Society

Cerebra

DLA Guide

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.