Advocacy

What is Advocacy?

Advocacy

Do you need help to be involved in decisions about your care needs? Or are you a carer of a young person who is about to start using adult services? Finding out about Advocacy is really important so that you or the young person you care for can be heard, understand your choices and make your own decisions.

What can an Advocate do?

Advocacy, Requesting Support in relation to the Care Act

Changes brought in by the Care Act mean that any decisions made by a local authority about your care will consider your well-being and what is important to you so that you can stay healthy and remain as independent as possible. To do this, it is important for you to be fully involved in decisions about your care and support needs.

An advocate can support you to…

  • Understand the assessment process
  • Understand your choices and make your own decisions
  • Tell others what you want and about your views and feelings
  • Help you to challenge a decision if you are not happy with it and
  • Make sure that you get the support you are entitled to.

Who needs advocacy?

You might be able to access advocacy if you are…

  • An adult who needs care and support
  • A carer of an adult
  • A carer of a young person who is about to start using adult services
  • A young person who is about to start using adult services.

And you find it very hard to…

  • Understand what is happening and the choices that you have
  • Decide what care and support you need
  • Tell people what you want
  • You do not have any friends or family available (or who feel able) to support you

Some people who lack capacity to make decisions in relation to their care or residence may already have an advocate appointed for them under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. If they do, it might be possible for the same advocate to be their Care Act advocate too.

Duty to provide advocacy support

Local authorities will be under a duty to provide an independent advocate where an adult may have “substantial difficulty” in doing one of the following…

  • Understanding relevant information
  • Retaining that information
  • Using or weighing up that information
  • Communicating their views, wishes or feelings.

And there is no appropriate person (such as a family member) who can support them.

 

When should an advocate be appointed?

The local authority will have to consider whether somebody has substantial difficulty in understanding matters and whether an advocate is therefore required in a number of scenarios including…

  • Carrying out needs assessments
  • Carrying out carer’s assessments
  • Preparing care and support plans for adults
  • Preparing support plans for carers
  • Revising care and support plans/support plans
  • Carrying out child’s needs assessment
  • Carrying out child’s carer’s assessment; and
  • Carrying out young carer’s assessments.

What happens next?

If a decision is made by a local authority about your care that you are not happy with, your advocate may be able to help. Your advocate can help you write a report about the things you don’t like to ask for the decision to be changed.

The local authority is under a duty to consider any written report from an advocate and respond in writing. It must also consider the advocate’s views when making decisions in relation to the individual in question.

An advocate may also be under a duty to bring legal proceedings on behalf of an individual that they represent, if disputes cannot be resolved with the local authority.

FIND LOADS MORE LEGAL SUPPORT, ADVOCATES & LAWYERS HERE...

Use our directory to find lots of charities and firms that can give you legal advice.

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Finances

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Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

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Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

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Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Public Law & Community Care, including Judicial Review

judicial review

If you are a carer, or care for someone, then this is for you. When you depend on accessing community care and services on a daily basis and you lose it, things can go badly wrong. You can be left at risk, vulnerable and alone and often unaware of your rights. Find out here what you can do, how to get help and about Judicial Reviews.

Irwin Mitchell have very kindly helped Sky Badger put these legal guides together. You can find them as well as lots of other organisations and charities specialising in legal advice at the bottom of this page.

What’s gone wrong?

Public bodies such as Local Authorities and health organisations make important decisions about the lives of vulnerable people and their access to services. Sometimes these decisions are unlawful and may need to be challenged. Sometimes the bodies delay making a decision or do not reply at all and this may also need to be challenged.

This might include some of the following things…

• Failure to carry out a community care assessment
• Failure to provide a suitable level of care following an assessment
• Withdrawal or reduction of a previous level of care
• Closure of care facilities such as day centres, respite centres, care homes or transport services
• Rights to welfare services, such as help with personal care
• Services to enable people to remain in their own homes
• Access to aids and adaptations in the home
• Direct payments and personal budgets
• Support for people on discharge from hospital, or to help safe discharge take place
• Incontinence services
• Wheelchair services
• Support to help people to access the community
• Challenges to closure of care homes and hospitals

This can also include Disputes between local authorities and NHS agencies about funding for care, including NHS continuing care.

What do I do next?

If you find yourself in this unfortunate situation, you can seek assistance or advice about steps you can take to challenge the decision. You can seek advice as a disabled person, a carer or a family member of a disabled child or adult. How to challenge the decision will depend on the type of decision made and the type of public body that has made the decision – so it is important to get good quality advice. You may need to make a formal complaint, start an appeal process, or start a Judicial review claim.

What is a Judicial Review?

Judicial review is the legal process used to hold public bodies to account and to challenge unlawful decisions. There are very strict time limits for bringing a challenge so it is important to seek advice as soon as possible if you think that an unlawful decision has been made.

 

A claim should be issued in court promptly and within 3 months of the decision, and before that your solicitor would write to the decision maker to set out details of the claim and wait for a response. So, you may need to get advice and legal representation fast.

This is a complicated process that solicitors can support you with in bringing cases on behalf of vulnerable disabled people to enforce their legal rights. You usually find that most cases can be resolved before going to court once other options and routes are explored. Judicial review should only be used as a last option.

Legal Aid may be available for advice and assistance.

FIND LOADS MORE LEGAL SUPPORT, ADVOCATES & LAWYERS HERE...

Use our directory to find lots of charities and firms that can give you legal advice.

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Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

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Holidays & Free time

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Useful technology & kit

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Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

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Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

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Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

A Guide to the Care Act 2014

What happens when my disabled child becomes an adult?  The Care Act 2014 offers carers more rights & protection both for themselves and for the disabled adult they care for... including parent carers! Find out how the Care Act can help you and your family here.

Irwin Mitchell have very kindly helped Sky Badger put these legal guides together. You can find them as well as lots of other organisations and charities specialising in legal advice at the bottom of this page.

Care Act

How can The Care Act help me?

Disabled adults and their carers may be able to access these services and support including…

  • Care assessments and care plans
  • Respite provision
  • Day centre provision
  • Activities in the community
  • Support by professional carers
  • Personal budgets and direct payments
  • Local offer
  • Carer’s rights (see links below for more details)
  • Transition provisions for teenagers in the run up to turning 18

Duties Upon Local Services

According to the Care Act, there is no fixed timescale for the assessment process, but the local authority should complete it within an appropriate and reasonable timescale. What is “appropriate and reasonable” will depend on the circumstances, such as the urgency of the need for support. In certain circumstances local authorities should consider providing interim services prior to completion of assessment.

  • Care assessment should include a ‘plan of action’ – make sure that there is a lawful care plan which shows what services are going to be provided, who is going to provide them, and when.
  • Local authority and health care bodies/other agencies (such as housing) must work together.

Local authorities must also provide information and advice to people about accessing support services, even where those needs are not going to be directly met by the local authority.

Promoting Wellbeing

The general duty of a Local authority is to promote the individual’s ‘wellbeing’; this means that when making any decisions under the Care Act the local authority should bear in mind;-

  • Physical and mental health & emotional well-being
  • Protection from abuse & neglect
  • Control by the individual over day-to-day life (including over care and support, or support, provided to the individual and the way in which it is provided);
  • Participation in work, education, training or recreation
  • Social & economic well-being
  • Domestic, family, and personal relationships;
  • Suitability of living accommodation; and
  • The individual’s contribution to society.
  • Personal dignity (including treatment of the individual with respect)
Care Act

The assessment process

Eligible needs, criteria to be assessed

You can request an assessment by telephone or in person, but it is always best to do it in writing so that you have a copy. This is the first step! It is important to work closely with the social worker, and give them as much information and other assessments/medical evidence as possible so that they can properly assess your son or daughter.

The second step is to determine what the disabled adult and carer’s needs are. This is done via the needs assessment process. One all needs have been identified, the social worker will then identify which of the needs are “eligible” needs and must be met by the local authority.

  • Under section 13 of the Care Act, local authorities will need to apply the eligibility criteria that are set out in the Regulations as a ”minimum”. The local authority only has a duty to meet needs that are “eligible” needs according to this national eligibility criteria.
  • The criteria apply across the country nationally, and so there should no longer be a postcode lottery when accessing care support.

A “needs assessment” will be carried out in a case where it appears a person “may have needs for care and support”. Where a carer may have needs for support, a carer’s assessment should also be carried out by the local authority. These assessments should be person-centred, meaning that the focus will be on what the individual wants to achieve. The assessments must consider the impact of the disabled person’s needs upon other family members – this is called the “whole family” approach. The assessments will be carried out by a social worker using an assessment tool that identifies your care needs as well as the whole family dynamics.

If the individual lacks capacity to make decisions about their care, or will have substantial difficulty in understanding the process, then the local authority must provide them with an independent advocate that can support them in the assessment process. That is, unless there is an appropriate person (like a family member) who can support them.

What does a good assessment plan look like?

There is no mandatory template for a care assessment that all Local Authorities will follow but Assessments should cover issues such as…

  • Diagnosis
  • Health and development, milestones etc
  • Communication needs
  • Equipment needs
  • Culture and identity
  • Any behavioural issues
  • Day-to-day care needs
  • Personal care needs
  • The person’s wishes and feelings in relation to their care and support
  • Need for respite

There must be a plan of action setting out how the needs will be met. The local authority should set this out in a separate document (a care and support plan).

Care Act

Direct Payments & Personal Budgets

At the end of the care and support plan you the local authority must set out your Personal budget. This is the pot of money allocated to you to meet your needs as set out in the care and support plan. This pot of money can be accessed by direct payments, which is where you receive the money yourself and pay carers directly. The other option is for the local authority to buy in services itself (called “direct commissioning”).

The local authority should set out clearly how the personal budget is calculated, so you can see why they have arrived at the figure. If you are going to manage the money yourself via direct payments, it is important that you understand your responsibilities from now on regarding managing this account and the administration duties.

(For more details on this subject please refer to personal budgets and direct payments guides)

Financial assessments

Local authorities will need to carry out a financial assessment to determine if a contribution needs to be paid towards the cost of the care. If individuals have income and savings above the upper threshold amounts, that person will be a “self-funder”, meaning they will have to pay for the care.

Looking for more legal advice?

Find legal support for your disabled or SEN child. Know their rights at school & find specialist advocates and lawyers.

Transitions & preparing for adulthood

Although the Care Act 2014 applies only to disabled adults, it does contain some important provisions relating to transition, as disabled teenagers approach adulthood.

Local authorities must carry out an assessment where it appears that a disabled child may have needs for care and support upon reaching 18. This is called a “child’s needs assessment”. The assessment process will identify how the child’s needs may impact on their wellbeing, what outcomes the child wants to achieve, and what care would help to achieve those outcomes. Authorities will need to determine whether it is likely that support will be required after the child turns 18, and must then provide advice about how those needs can be met or reduced now, or prevented or delayed.

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About EHCP's

The Education, Health and Care plan is an exciting new way of supporting your child at school. Find out more about EHCP's here.

 

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Holiday Grants

Find lots of charities giving holiday grants for you and your family. . Some grants are just for the child, some for their siblings too and others will pay for holidays for the whole family.

Find advocates, lawyers & more legal support here...

Use our directory to find lots more legal support for your whole family.

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Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

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Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

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Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

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Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

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Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

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Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

DLA Form – A Step by Step Guide

Welcome to the very best guide to filling In your child's Disability Living Allowance (DLA) form

DLA Form

The DLA claim form is huge and it can seem daunting at first glance. But don't panic. Take your time, use this guide and  you should be able to complete it without too much trouble.

We know that its tempting, when you receive the form to just put it to one side for a while, but don't! If you can avoid this temptation you'll have time to do it bit by bit and not feel rushed.

Now put the kettle on, get some biscuits and lets begin...

Top Tips

  • Read through it first before putting pen to paper so you have an idea of what’s needed.
  • If possible get specialist advice from a welfare benefits adviser or someone else who is familiar with completing the form. This will increase the likelihood of your child being awarded the right level of DLA.
  • Keep a diary for a week before tackling the form. Include details of the amounts and types of care your child needs during the day and night. This will be useful when you fill in the form and can be used as evidence. It will also be a useful aid in helping you think about all the extra help your child needs.
  • Give as much information as possible. You can write outside of the boxes and attach extra sheets if you run out of space.
  • Don‘t play down your child‘s condition. Although it‘s hard, try not to overplay details of your child’s abilities and achievements. Include the bad days, as these will give the decision makers an insight into the full extent of your child’s needs.
  • If your child has a fluctuating condition use the terms ‘bad days‘ and ‘better days‘ to describe the changes in their condition. Using terms like ‘good days’ or ‘normal days’ can imply your child needs no extra help on these days. Say how often your child needs help, rather than how often they get help.
  • Remember that your aim in filling in the form is to give as clear a picture as possible of your child’s difficulties. Much of the form consists of tick boxes with a few lines for you to describe their problems more clearly. However, you do not have to be constricted by this structure and can carry on writing below the lines if necessary, or even attach an extra piece of paper.
  • Show how your child‘s needs are different to those of other children of the same age. Is your child’s level of competence age-appropriate for different tasks? If you have older children compare their needs at the same age or compare your child’s needs with those of a friend or family member’s child.
  • Ask yourself – have you included enough detail to convince someone who hasn‘t met your child? The application will be assessed by someone who hasn’t met your child and who may not be familiar with your child’s condition. If they have a rare condition, you may have information about it you can include to help the decision maker understand more.
  • Include supporting evidence with the form if you have it. This can be medical reports, speech and language assessments, psychological reports, and a statement of special educational needs – 6+anything that supports what you’ve said in the form.
    But don’t delay making a claim if you haven’t got these reports yet, as
  • DLA can’t be backdated and you could lose out. If you write on the form that you‘ll be sending further information the decision makers should accept it.

Terminology

Personal Budgets

To assess what rate of DLA should be paid, some of the words they will be looking for in the rules have a specific meaning...

'Bodily functions'
Includes anything to do with how the body works, like breathing, eating, drinking, hearing, seeing, walking, sitting, dressing, undressing, washing, bathing, toileting and sleeping.

If the help can be done in another room, away from the child, it is unlikely to count unless it is closely connected to something personal, for example changing bedding after a child has wet the bed.

'Supervision'
Someone present to prevent any accidents or harm to your child or others.

'Substantial danger'
there must be a realistic possibility that without supervision your child could seriously risk harming themselves or others. This situation may arise infrequently or be a one-off.

'Night'
Starts from when the whole household goes to bed and ends when everyone gets up. Night-time needs means that during the night your child requires either:

  • ‘prolonged’ help with their personal care. (This means for at least 20 minutes)
  • ‘repeated’ help with personal care during the night (This means at least twice)
  • to avoid danger to themselves, or others, another person needs to be awake and watching over them for either a ‘prolonged’ period or at ‘frequent intervals’ (this means more than twice).

Filling in the DLA Form

DLA Form

A Step-by-Step Guide to Filling in your DLA Form

The first parts of the claim form (parts 1 – 24) are fairly straight forward they are asking for basic information about your child and the people involved in their care. Parts 25-36 are the mobility questions, and parts 37-55 are the care questions.

You will see that on the DLA Form, the basic format of these pages is similar, with a series of tick box questions followed by some space to expand on your answers. In this guide we go through these questions one by one.

This guide is designed so that you can dip in and out of it as necessary and just refer to the parts you need. Equally, you can work through it page by page as it reflects the arrangement of the new DLA child claim form. In either case, read through these introductory notes before you start.

How to Complete Your Child’s DLA Claim Form

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Disability Living Allowance - Mobility (physical difficulties)

DLA Q.25 - Can they physically walk?

If the child cannot physically walk at all then tick no under question 25 of your DLA claim pack and continue to question 36 – you do not need to fill out any of the other sections in between. Tick yes if the child can physically walk and continue onto question 26.

DLA Q.26 - Do they have physical difficulties walking?

If the child has difficulties walking which affects their speed, health, the way they walk, how long it takes them, how far the can walk or they require a considerable amount of effort to walk then tick yes under question 26 of your DLA claim pack then move onto the following questions. Tick no if the child doesn’t have any physical difficulties walking, and move onto question 32 (behavioural difficulties walking).

Some children with learning disabilities or autism spectrum disorders can qualify for higher rate mobility because of severe behavioural problems from age three.

Think about why your child needs more guidance or supervision than children the same age.

• does your child have behavioural problems which could lead to danger?
• do they have a learning or communication problem which means they could get lost or are
• more vulnerable to danger?
• does your child have a visual or hearing impairment and need extra help with following directions and avoiding obstacles?
• does your child’s hearing impairment mean they can’t hear dangers coming from behind?
• are they likely to stumble or fall without someone’s help?

Virtual inability to walk due to refusal episodes

Some children, because of their condition, regularly refuse to walk. If these episodes are regular and unpredictable enough then you may be able to claim the higher rate as they can be said to render your child ‘virtually unable to walk’.

However, the refusals must be as a result of the child having a physical disability. Some conditions, such as autism and Down Syndrome have been considered physical by DLA case law as they stem from the brain which is a physical organ of the body. Other conditions may not be considered in this way, and certainly higher functioning children with conditions such as Asperger’s Syndrome, Dyspraxia, ADHD etc will be very unlikely to qualify under the criteria in this appendix.

If your child has severe behavioural problems and a severe mental impairment, or regularly refuses to walk due to a neurological condition, please tick yes to question 26 and use the following guide to complete questions 27-36.;- ( refer to the notes on mental health below these questions).

DLA Q.27

Don’t tick any of the boxes! Write in the space between the suggestions and the tick boxes something to the effect of ‘Regularly and unpredictably refuses to walk’.

DLA Q.28

As for question 27, don’t tick any boxes and just write ‘regularly and unpredictably refuses to walk’.
DLA Q.29. Again, don’t tick any boxes but you can use the small text box at the bottom to say that your child regularly and unpredictable refuses to walk.

DLA Q.30

Tick ‘no’ (unless they have a co-morbid condition that means that it does).

DLA Q.31

This is where you need to describe the refusal episodes. Start by saying that they are caused by your child’s condition; that they happen regularly and unpredictably; that they are not just naughty behaviour (suggest what causes them, e.g. inflexibility of thinking, sensory overload etc); that they cannot just be overcome by punishment or reward; what happens if you try to move your child (eg hits you, smashes their head on the ground etc); how long they last for; how difficult/impossible it is to make any further progress; and, finally, how you consider your child to be ‘virtually unable to walk’ as a result.

Anything else you want to tell them? (use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form);-

• Child may have breathing problems that are exacerbated by walking
• May have a heart condition that makes the effort of walking dangerous
• May be prone to dizziness or epileptic absences that restrict the distance they can walk
• Hypermobility may cause joint pain and restrict walking distance
• If your child walks with a limp/on their toes/with feet turned inwards etc, explain what causes this.

High Rate DLA

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Severe Mental Impairment and Severe Behavioural Problems

Some children can be entitled to the higher rate mobility component under this category.

Severe mental impairment is not a nice thing to have to say about your child but remember it’s just benefits terminology. It is a technical and complex regulation, and they have to satisfy a five point test:

1. They must be entitled to the higher rate of the care component.
If this is a new claim you will not know what award of care component they will have, but if they have care needs day and night then you will just have to assume that they will. Don’t wait for the award of the care component first and then try to claim under this route later.

2. They suffer from ‘a state of arrested or incomplete physical development of the brain which results in severe impairment of intelligence and social functioning’
Again, some conditions are considered as fulfilling this criteria and others are not, as described earlier. You still have to show that your child has a severe impairment of intelligence and social functioning. For some children this is easy and can be related to their IQ, however some children can be reasonably intelligent but unable to use that intelligence (eg non-verbal children) and so could still qualify. Impairment of social functioning relates to how your child interacts with others, how they are able or unable to cope in society. Generally, children who attend mainstream school would not pass this part of the test, although this is not always the case.

3. They exhibit disruptive behaviour which is ‘extreme’
This relates to your child’s behaviour outside of the home, whilst trying to get about. Extreme means wholly out of the ordinary, things like running off and shouting are not enough.

4. They must regularly need another person to intervene and physically restrain them to prevent them causing physical injury to themselves or others or damage to property
This is fairly self-explanatory, and demonstrates the extremity of behaviour that is required to be shown to achieve higher rate mobility by this route. However, physical restraint can just be a hand on the arm, rather than literally pinning your child down.

5. Their behaviour must be so unpredictable that they require another person to watch over them whenever they are awake.
In other words, your child can never be left alone due to the severity of their behaviour. This will include demonstrating that they need this level of supervision at school as well as at home.

So, if you’ve decided that your child may qualify via this route you need to show that on the claim form! This is a suggestion of how you might complete questions 26-31 for the severe mental impairment and severe behavioural problems route:

DLA Q.32 - Do they need guidance or supervision most of the time when they walk outdoors?

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Read through the examples and explanations below and if you decide your child needs extra supervision or guidance when outdoors then tick 'yes' at the top of the page for question 32.

Only tick ‘no’ to question 32 if you have looked at the examples below and decided you don’t have such problems, and then move to question 33.

Answer ‘no’ if they cannot...

  • Find their way around places they know; In familiar places the child would get lost and if on their own they would not be able to find their way without any assistance.
  • Ask for and follow directions; The child cannot communicate clearly enough to ask for directions, or understand what is being said to them. If lost they could not follow directions to find their way.
  • Walk safely next to a busy road ; The child doesn’t know how to behave next to a busy road at all times; they may run off or get distracted by things.
  • Cross a road safely; Don’t know how to check for traffic and use pedestrian crossings on their own in all contexts and situations.
  • Understand common dangers outdoors ; Cannot behave safely around traffic, ponds etc. Child is unaware of stranger danger. Child is not able to read and understand warning signs and signals.

Phrasing of the question has now changed!  Answer 'yes' if they regularly...

  • Become anxious, confused or disorientated; Worry about things that would not normally bother other children, not know where they are or what they are doing.
  • Display unpredictable behaviour; May have tantrums, run off, invade another person’s space, get very upset, and be aggressive or verbally abusive.
  • Need physical restraint; In order to protect the child or others they may need to be strapped into a buggy, on reins, or have someone holding onto them.

Refuse to walk

  • The child will not walk due to behavioural issues, they throw themselves on the floor and have a tantrum, changes to routine or anxieties result in the child refusing to walk.
  • They need lots of encouragement to walk.
  • Need supervision to ensure they don’t use too much energy or hurt themselves.
  • Need to be supervised as they have seizures, you have to monitor them, keep them safe during and help with recovery afterwards.
  • Have a visual or hearing impairment and need someone to help guide or supervise them.
  • Cannot judge speeds or distance and need help crossing roads.
  • Child is easily distracted and has a lack of danger awareness e.g. if they saw someone on the other side of the road they would run without looking.
  • Have episodes of incontinence, need guiding to the nearest toilet, and/or help with toileting needs.
  • Child is scared to go outside alone due to fears and anxieties related to their condition.
  • Inappropriate behaviour such as shouting, kicking, being destructive etc.
  • Can be compulsive and want to count things, touch things smell things etc. before walking on
  • Have panic attacks and need someone to watch for them and help calm them down.
  • Sensory overload e.g. loud sounds, strong smells etc. can distress the child resulting in refusal episodes.
  • A rigid routine has to be enforced when outdoors and the environment controlled as much as possible to prevent meltdowns and refusals.

Balance problems mean the child falls over frequently

  • Any bumps or bruises can have a serious affect to their health.
  • Need supervision to watch for signs of tantrums and/or attempts to run off.
  • They can become confrontational, aggressive and abusive towards strangers.

Only tick no to question 32 if you have looked at the examples below and decided you don’t have such problems, and then move to question 33.

DLA Q33 - Do they fall due to their disability?

If your child often trips and falls due to their condition then tick yes and record the number of falls each month. If they do not fall due to their condition continue onto section 34.

Answer yes if they...

Can get up without help; They get up on their own and don’t need someone to physically help them get up, or give them encouragement.

DLA Q.34 - If you want to tell them why you have ticked the boxes, how their needs vary or anything else you think they should know, then record it here

For example… Has your child had injuries needing hospital treatment? The child has had a trip or fall that is directly related to their condition and as a result has needed to have treatment in a hospital e.g. stitches, casts, brain  scans etc.

DLA Q.35 - Extra information about mobility

Use this box to put down any additional information that you couldn’t fit in boxes 31 or 34, use the previous section of the guide to help with this.

DLA Q.36 - When did the child’s mobility needs you have told us about start?

The age at which you first noticed your child’s mobility difficulties e.g. the child not meeting developmental milestones, experiencing pain, refusing to walk or severe behavioural problems.

 

DLA Q.37 - Getting into or out of or settling in bed during the day

Disability Living Allowance Stairs

Do they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to get into or out of or settling in bed during the day?

If your child gets any extra help or encouragement waking up, lifting their legs into or out of bed, sitting up or settling in bed please tick yes at the top of the page under question 37 .

Only tick 'no' if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have looked at the examples and decided your child doesn’t have such problems.

During the day includes putting the child to bed at bedtime and waking them in the morning plus any sleeps during the day but does NOT include any awakenings during the night (when the rest of the household is in bed) – this will be dealt in section 53.

How often each day and how long for? (use this column to decide how often each day and how long each time the child needs help with each task);

Fill in timings if they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to...

Wake up

  • Include waking the child up in the morning and from any daytime sleeps.
  • The time it takes from first trying to wake the child until they are fully awake and conscious
  • How often each day; How long each time (mins)?

Get out of bed

  • Include physically helping the child out of bed, and encouraging/prompting the child to get out of bed.
  • The amount of time it takes from deciding it is time to get the child up until  the child is out of bed (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day; How long each time (mins)?

Get into bed

  • Include physically helping the child into bed and encouraging/prompting the child to get into bed, both at bedtime and for any daytime sleeps.
  • The amount of time it takes from deciding it is time for the child to go to bed (after any care needs such as bathing or toileting) until the child is in bed (include following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day; How long each time (mins)?

Settle into bed

  • Include settling the child at bedtime and for any sleeps during the day.
  • The amount of time it takes from when the child is first in bed until they are settled and starting to fall asleep.
  • How often each day; How long each time (mins)?

Anything  else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form.

  • Need physical help waking, getting up, going to bed and settling.
  • A lengthy/rigid routine has to be put in place.
  • The child needs watching over as they can be a danger to themselves or others.
  • They are too tired to get up due to night time awakenings.
  • Lack of motivation to get up.
  • They experience physical pain and/or exhaustion making it difficult to get up.
  • Emotional distress/worry makes the child reluctant to get up.
  • Effects of medication (e.g. drowsiness).
  • Need help with covers and pillows.
  • Transferring the child from a wheelchair or using hoists.
  • Persuading and reassuring the child due to behavioural, sensory or medical issues.
  • They are still wide awake and active at bedtime.
  • They get out of bed and disrupt the rest of the household.

DLA Q.38 – Toilet needs during the day

Do they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to go to or use the toilet during the day?

If your child gets any extra help going to the toilet, managing clothes, getting on or off and using the toilet, cleaning themselves and coping with continence care please tick yes at the top of the page under question 38. Only tick ‘no’ if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided your child doesn’t have such problems.

(Do NOT include any issues with toileting that occur during the night, such as bed wetting - this will be dealt with in section 53.)

Tick the box if they need encouraging, prompting or physical help...

Going to the toilet - To go to the toilet during the day, including reminding the child to go to the toilet, guiding them to the toilet or supervising them while going to the toilet.

Manage clothes -When dressing or undressing when going to the toilet, including when managing nappies, pads, catheters, stomas etc. Or changing/cleaning clothes after accidents.

Get on and off the toilet -When getting on and off the toilet, including supervision and transferring from a wheelchair onto/off the toilet (incl. hoists.), and supervision whilst using the toilet.

Wipe themselves-Help the child to wipe themselves after going to the toilet, include supervising and checking that they have wiped themselves properly.

Wash and dry their hands - Help the child to wash and dry their hands, including supervising (eg. making sure child does not burn themselves on hot water, eat soap etc.), and physically helping the child to reach taps.

Manage a catheter, ostomy or stoma - Help the child to manage any continence aids, include emptying, cleaning, checking etc. Instructing/explaining to the child how to use them and/or what they are for.

Manage nappies or pads - Help the child with nappies and pads, include physically changing nappies (including cleaning the child), and helping/supervising a child with pads.

Anything else you think you should tell them? This can include things like…

  • Needs supervising when using the toilet for safety reasons and/or because they are easily distracted.
  • Cleaning the toilet area after the child.
  • Help with trousers, underwear, buttons and fastenings, checking clothing and appearance after going to the toilet.
  • Dealing with episodes of incontinence.
  • Need help knowing when their bladder or bowels need emptying.
  • Painful/frequent bowel movements or urination.
  • Comforting the child if they experience pain or distress when using the toilet.
  • Help with personal hygiene (including needing to bath/shower after going to the toilet)
  • Assisting with medication and creams relating to toileting.
  • Suffer from frequent constipation or loose bowels.
  • Dealing with smearing, eating or playing with faeces.
  • Child goes to the toilet in other places around the home.
  • Miss the toilet when urinating.
  • Calming and reassuring a child who finds toileting distressing or gets anxious.
  • Taking samples for monitoring/medical purposes.

DLA Q.39 – Moving around indoors during the day

Disability Living Allowance Stairs

Do they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to move around indoors, using stairs or getting in or out of a chair?

If your child gets any extra help to move from one place to another when indoors please tick yes at the top of the page under question. Only tick no if you have read the examples on the form and decided your child doesn’t have such problems.

Tick the box if they need encouragement, prompting or physical help...

Go up and down one step -While moving up and down one step to ensure their safety, help with movement and co-ordination, to enable them to get from one place to another and/or to use any aids.

Examples and Explanations to decide whether to select yes or no in the tick boxes…..

Go upstairs - While moving up a flight of stairs to ensure their safety, help with movement and co-ordination and to enable them to get from one place to another and/or to use any aids.

Go downstairs - While moving down a flight of stairs to ensure their safety, help with movement and co-ordination and to enable them to get from one place to another and/or to use any aids.

Move around safely - While moving around indoors to ensure their safety, trying to prevent falls and accidents, guiding the child and making sure they know where they are going and making them aware of their surroundings.

Get into or out of a chair - To get into or out of a chair as they may be unable to do it alone, to ensure their safety and/or because it takes them a long time.

Sit in a chair - To sit safely in a chair, including the use of specialised seating or postural support equipment, regularly moving the child because sitting for prolonged periods may cause pain or stiffness.

Anything else you want to tell them? This can include things like…

  • Child is physically unable to walk or move without help.
  • Child may suffer pain, stiffness or flaccidity when they move.
  • Child has limited movements/control.
  • Child can’t stand for long periods of time, may cause pain, fatigue etc.
  • Child suffers from uncontrollable spasms and movements.
  • Child has poor balance, spatial awareness or motor skills.
  • Child becomes exhausted easily.
  • They need hand rails or have to hold on to things very tightly to pull themselves up. Child moves very slowly.
  • Child is unable to manipulate objects, such as opening and closing doors.
  • Child needs objects and aids to steady themselves, such as walkers or canes.
  • Child has to use certain techniques when indoors, such as going on their bottom to go up and down stairs, or rolling off chairs onto knees.
  • Getting up from sitting is painful or potentially damaging to the child’s health.
  • Need a lot more encouragement or help to learn skills such as sitting, crawling, standing, walking, running.

DLA Q.40 – Washing, bathing, showering and checking appearance during the day

OCD

Do they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to wash, bath, shower and check their appearance during the day?

If your child gets any extra help getting in or out of a bath or shower, washing or drying themselves, brushing their teeth and checking their appearance please tick yes at the top of the page under question 40. Only tick no if you have read the examples on the form and have and decided your child doesn’t have such problems.

How often each day and how long for, use this column to decide how often each day and how long each time the child needs help with each task. Fill in timings if they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to...

Have a wash

  • All times during the day that the child has a wash, including washing in the morning and/or at bedtime and washing before/after certain activities.
  • The time it takes from the start of a wash (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child is washed and dried (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Clean their teeth

  • All times during the day that the child cleans their teeth or needs physical help or prompting to do so. The time it takes from the start of teeth cleaning (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child’s teeth are cleaned (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Wash their hair

  • All times during the day that the child washes their hair or needs physical help or prompting to do so.
  • The time it takes from the start of washing their hair (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child’s hair is washed (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Get in or out of the bath

  • All times during the day that the child gets in or out of the bath and needs physical help or prompting to do so.
  • The time it takes to get in and/or out of the bath (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child is safely/comfortably in or out of the bath (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Get in or out of the shower

  • All times during the day that the child gets in or out of the shower and needs physical help or prompting to do so.
  • The time it takes to get in and/or out of the shower (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child is safely/comfortably in or out of the shower (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

 

Clean themselves - in the bath or shower

  • All times during the day that the child cleans themselves in the bath or shower and needs physical help or prompting to do so.
  • The time it takes the child to clean themselves in the bath or shower (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child is adequately cleaned (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Dry themselves after a bath or shower

  • All times during the day that the child dries themselves after a bath or shower and needs physical help or prompting to do so.
  • The time it takes the child to dry themselves after a bath or shower (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child is adequately dried (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Check their appearance

  • All the times that the child needs to check their appearance during the day including brushing hair, shaving, applying cosmetics etc.
  • The time it takes the child to check their appearance from start to finish (including any prior prompting and encouragement) and including following a routine or refusals.
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

 

Anything  else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

Child is physically unable to cope with any aspects of washing, bathing, showering and checking appearance.

  • Has to follow a very lengthy and rigid routine. Have pain associated with getting to and from the bathroom, getting into or out of the bath, while in the bath or shower or while washing.
  • Child is resistant to washing, can be aggressive.
  • Have problems because they have areas that have to be kept dry, such as dressings, a line into a vein or a stoma appliance etc.
  • No danger awareness so needs supervising whilst washing to ensure their safety, for example they might leave taps running, eat soap, scald themselves etc.
  • Have to wash more often than other children.
  • Need someone to check that they have washed properly.

DLA Q.41 – Dressing and undressing during the day

StockSnap_NY963ZH6T2

Do they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to dress and undress during the day?

If your child gets any extra help with any form of dressing or undressing (except when using the toilet) please tick yes at the top of the page under question 41. Only tick ‘no’ if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

How often each day and how long for (use this column to decide how often each day and how long each time the child needs help with each task) Fill in timings if they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to...

Dress

  • All times during the day that the child gets dressed, including in the morning, at bedtime, for any activities such as sports and swimming, redressing if a child continues to take clothes off during the day, and changing any soiled clothes.
  • The time it takes from the start of dressing the child (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child is fully dressed (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Undress

  • All times during the day that the child gets undressed, including in the morning, at bedtime, for any activities such as sports and swimming, and changing any soiled clothes.
  • The time it takes from the start of undressing the child (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child is fully undressed (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

 

Manage - zips, buttons or other fastenings      

  • All times during the day that the child needs help with zips, buttons or other fastenings, including shoe laces.
  • The time it takes to help the child with zips, buttons or other fastenings (including any prior prompting and encouragement), including following a routine or refusals.
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Choose appropriate clothes

  • All times during the day that the child needs help choosing appropriate clothing including in the morning, at night, for any activities such as sports and swimming, and changing any soiled clothes.
  • The time it takes to choose appropriate clothing for the child.
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

 

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • Child physically cannot dress or undress themselves.
  • Child experiences pain and discomfort when trying to dress or undress.
  • Child has fine motor skills problems.
  • Need to follow a lengthy or rigid routine.
  • Clothes have to be laid out or put on in a specific order.
  • Sensory issues with clothing means clothes have to be carefully chosen, for example, labels have to be taken out, specific materials, colours etc.
  • Need to check that clothes are put on properly, right way round etc.
  • They are easily distracted and dressing and undressing can be a very long process.
  • Need special clothing that is easy to get on or off, is medically adapted etc.
  • Find dressing and undressing a distressing experience and need reassurance and support.
  • The child likes to get undressed at inappropriate times and places.
  • Child can be very resistant to getting dressed or undressed, may get aggressive.

DLA Q.42 – Eating and drinking during the day

Disability Living Allowance Eating

Do they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to eat and drink during the day?

If your child gets any extra help getting food into their mouth, chewing and swallowing, using cutlery, cutting up food, holding a cup and drinking please tick yes at the top of the page under question 42. Only tick ‘no’ if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

How often each day and how long for (use this column to decide how often each day and how long each time the child needs help with each task) Fill in timings if they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to...

Eat

  • All times during the day that the child eats, including meals and snacks.
  • The time it takes from beginning the meal or snack (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child has finished (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Use a spoon

  • All times during the day that the child has help to use a spoon during the day, including snacks.
  • The time it takes the child to use a spoon with encouragement, help and prompting (including refusals, pauses and breaks).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Cut up food on their plate

  • All times during the day that the child has help cutting up their food, including cutting up food in the preparation stages.
  • The time it takes for the child to cut up food on their plate, any help they may need, or cutting food up for the child.
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Drink using a cup

  • All times during the day that the child has help to drink using a cup.
  • The time it takes for the child to drink using a cup, including and additional help needed.
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Be tube or pump fed

  • All times during the day that the child needs to be tube or pump fed (each individual feeding).
  • The time it takes from the beginning of the process until the end, including preparing, cleaning and setting up equipment.
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • Child has problems chewing, swallowing and sucking, which makes it more difficult, time consuming and/or hazardous.
  • Child experiences pain and/or discomfort when eating and drinking, and needs comforting, prompting, reassuring etc.
  • Additional preparation is required due to specific dietary needs and/or eating difficulties.
  • Child is unable or finds it difficult and painful to manipulate objects such as cutlery and cups.
  • Child has a special dietary requirement which means avoiding certain foods, precise measuring and monitoring etc.
  • Eating and drinking is a very lengthy process due to pain, difficulties, special requirements, child is easily distracted, behavioural problems etc.
  • Does medication impact on eating and drinking e.g. affect appetite, types of food that can be eaten, meal timings etc.
  • Eating patterns are different from a child of the same age.
  • Child has to have constant supervision otherwise they may eat dangerous/inedible things.
  • Child will only eat certain foods, presented in a particular way, will only eat from a certain plate, may be brand specific etc.
  • They eat in socially unacceptable ways e.g. very noisily or messily, they will only use their fingers etc.
  • Child needs to be reminded or prompted to eat and drink during the day.

DLA Q.43 – Taking medication or having therapy during the day

DLA health

Do they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to take medication or have therapy during the day?

If your child gets any extra help to take their medication, be reminded of when, how and the quantity to take or have their therapy please tick yes at the top of the page under question 43. Only tick no if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

How often each day and how long for, use this to decide how often each day and how long each time the child needs help with each task). Fill in timings if they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to...

Take the correct medicine

  • All times during the day that the child needs help to take the correct medicine, including physical help, preparation, supervision, encouragement etc.
  • The time it takes for the child to take the correct medicine (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child has taken it (including any refusal episodes).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Know when to take their medicine

  • All times during the day that the child needs help to know when to take their medicine, including reminding and reassuring.
  • The time it takes for the child to know when to take their medicine including any prior prompting and encouragement.
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Do their therapy

  • All the times during the day that the child needs help to do their therapy, including physical help, preparation, supervision, encouragement etc.
  • The time it takes from the child starting their therapy (including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child has completed it (including any refusal episodes).
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Know when to do their therapy

  • All times during the day that the child needs help to know when to do their therapy, including reminding and reassuring.
  • The time it takes for the child to know when to do their therapy including any prior prompting and encouragement.
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • Child may not like taking medication; get upset and angry, refuse to take it, have a tantrum etc. and need comforting and reassuring.
  • Child may need physical help administering medicine e.g. injections, eye drops etc. and using other pieces of medical equipment.
  • Cleaning wounds, changing dressings etc.
  • Preparing medication and making it more palatable.
  • Reminding the child to take medication as they may forget.
  • Monitoring for warning signs that medication needs to be taken e.g. temperatures, difficulty breathing, blood sugar levels etc.
  • Refusal episodes, as the child experiences pain/discomfort from the medication.
  • Calculating timings for medication or therapy.
  • Reminding the child to do their therapy and supervising to make sure it is done properly.
  • Physically helping the child with therapy, before, during and after.
  • Encouraging, reassuring and comforting the child during their therapy.

DLA Q.44 – Seeing

Disability Living Allowance Seeing

Do they have difficulty seeing?

If your child has difficulty seeing when using their aids like glasses or contact lenses then tick yes at the top of the page under question 44. Only tick ‘no’ if your child does not have a Certificate of Vision Impairment and any difficulties they do have are corrected perfectly by aids such as glasses.

Are they certified sight impaired or severely sight impaired?

Certified severely sight impaired

An examiner would have certified your child sight impaired or severely sight impaired, you would have been made aware of this and given a Certificate of Vision Impairment (CVI). If your child has a severe sight impairment then tick the box and move onto the next question. If your child is certified sight impaired (not severely) tick the box and mark the boxes that apply.

Remember to tell them if you want the copy of your CVI, returned to you – write this anywhere on the page.

Certified sight impaired

Only tick ‘yes’ to these boxes if the child can see each thing clearly and does not need, support guidance or any extra help with their vision…

  • Computer keyboard keys or large print in a book
  • TV and follow the actions to a story
  • The shape of furniture in a room
  • Someone’s face across a room
  • Someone across a street

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • Vision is made worse in poorly lit places.
  • Vision is made worse due to sensitivity to light.
  • The child experiences headaches etc. due to poor vision.
  • The child needs lots of extra help and support due to difficulty seeing to prevent them from coming to harm and to ensure their needs are met.
  • Child gets very anxious and upset due to their sight impairment.
  • They can’t take part in certain activities due to their vision.
  • Eye treatments such as drops, an eye patch etc. have to be monitored and administered.
  • Child uses Braille, has a guide or uses other aids and adaptions.

DLA Q.45 – Hearing

Disability Living Allowance Hearing

Do they have difficulty hearing?

If your child has difficulty hearing sound or someone speaking when using their hearing aids then tick yes at the top of the page under question 45. If your child has not been issued hearing aids but still has problems hearing after any other aid or adaption they have then also tick yes e.g. the child may have grommets or a cochlear implant but still has difficulty hearing. Only tick ‘no’ if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

Have they had an audiology test in the last 6 months?

If they have had an audiology test due to a difficulty in hearing please tick yes. If you have any reports confirming the child’s difficulty in hearing then attach a copy if you can.

Remember to tell them if you want the copy of your audiology report returned – write this anywhere on the page.

Answer ‘yes’ if they can hear...

  • A whisper in a quiet room
  • A normal voice in a quiet room
  • A loud voice in a quiet room
  • A TV, radio or CD but only at a very loud volume
  • A school bell or a car horn

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • The child cannot hear things if there is a lot of background noise.
  • Hearing is made worse by sensitivity to noise.
  • The child has frequent medical issues e.g. ear aches due to hearing difficulties.
  • The child needs lots of extra help and support due to difficulty hearing to prevent them from coming to harm and to ensure their needs are met.
  • Child gets very anxious and upset due to their hearing.
  • They can’t take part in certain activities due to their hearing.
  • Ear treatments such as drops etc. have to be monitored and administered.
  • The child uses sign language, has a guide or uses other aids and adaptions.

DLA Q.46 – Speaking

Do they have difficulty speaking?

If your child has difficulty saying words out loud and talking clearly then tick yes at the top of the page under question 46. Only tick no if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

Answer ‘yes’ if they can…

  • Speak clearly in sentences - Child can speak in clear sentences that have meaning and are relevant to the situation.
  • Put words together to make simple sentences - Child can put a few words together to make a meaningful sentence such as ‘I want banana’.
  • Speak single words - Child can speak single words ‘dog’, ‘ball’ etc. but cannot build them into sentences.

Answer ‘yes’ if they can communicate using speech…

  • With someone they know - The child can effectively communicate with someone who is familiar to them using speech. They may use simple sentences or single words but these can easily be understood by someone who knows them.
  • With someone they don’t know – Child’s speech is clear and complex enough to effectively communicate with a stranger. They can talk out loud, clearly and be easily understood by someone who does not know them.

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • Child has a physical impairment which means they cannot speak or their speech is difficult to understand.
  • They copy and echo sounds rather than use speech to communicate.
  • They have the vocabulary/speech of a much younger child.
  • Child is receiving speech and language therapy.
  • They get angry and distressed if people do not understand what they are saying.
  • They are embarrassed, self-conscious about speaking so withdraw from speech, or will only talk to people they are familiar with.

DLA Q.47 - Communicating.

Disability Living Allowance Communicating

Do they have difficulty and need extra help communicating?

If your child has difficulty and needs extra help passing on information, asking and answering questions, telling people how they feel and giving and following instructions please tick yes at the top of the page under question 47. Only tick no if you have read the boxes and have decided you don’t have such problems.

Answer yes if to communicate they use...

  • Writing - Child may sometimes need to write or have things written down in order for them to communicate effectively.
  • BSL (British Sign Language) - Use sign language and have difficulty understanding and making themselves understood in spoken language.
  • Lip-reading - Child communicates by reading lips.
  • Using hand movements, facial expressions and body language - Child uses a series of movements, expressions, gestures etc. to communicate (not Makaton or BSL), these may be specific to an individual, family, group of people or area.
  • Makaton - Communicating using more basic signs and symbols.
  • Other forms of communication - Touch pad or computer screen, Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS), use an interpreter or other specially designed communication aid.

Answer ‘yes’ if they can communicate...

  • With someone they know -The child can effectively communicate their thoughts, needs and feelings with someone who is familiar to them. They may have their own specific way of communicating using sounds, signs and expressions that only certain people understand. Or they may need someone to communicate in a certain way so they can understand
  • g. slowly and clearly. The child may be shy, withdrawn, and anxious and only communicate with people they know.
  • With someone they don’t know -The child can effectively communicate their thoughts, needs and feelings with people they don’t know. They do not need help with interpretation (including parents), and can be understood by others. Child is not withdrawn or shy and does not need to be familiar with someone in order to communicate.

 

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • They find it difficult to understand long complex sentences and need people to communicate slowly, clearly, and not to obstruct their face.
  • Often need things repeated and to be explained in several different ways.
  • They need time to process what is being said.
  • Child becomes confused by figures of speech, sarcasm, humour etc.
  • They struggle to understand non-verbal communication such as facial expressions, gestures and body language.
  • You have to get and hold the child’s attention when talking to them as they are easily distracted, avoid eye contact etc.
  • Become very nervous, anxious or self-conscious when talking to others due to physical, emotional and social issues, they need reassurance and help building self-confidence.
  • Child shouts, talks very fast, changes conversation too quickly or cannot keep up with conversation.
  • Child talks at you rather than with you, and may talk repeatedly or obsessively about certain topics.
  • Use inappropriate language, gestures and body language e.g. they may invade personal space or say things that people may take offence to.
  • They find it easier to talk to adults rather than children of their own age.
  • Child is shy and often withdraws from social situations and needs lots of encouragement and reassurance when communicating otherwise will become isolated.
  • Child gets very upset, anxious and aggressive when communicating and needs a lot of support and reassurances.

DLA Q.48 – Fits, blackouts, seizures or similar

Do they have fits, blackouts, seizures or something similar?

If your child has fits, blackouts, seizures or similar, including epileptic, non-epileptic or febrile fits, faints, absences, loss of consciousness and hypoglycaemic attacks tick yes at the top of the page under question 48 (you have more space below to explain what happens). Only tick no if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

Tell us what type they have and what happens? For instance are they absences or tonic clonic seizures? Give a brief description of what happens e.g child collapses, is unaware of their surroundings etc

Answer ‘yes’ if they...

  • Can recognise a warning and tell an adult - Warning signs are clear and reliable; the child can recognise a warning and have enough time to let an adult know.
  • Can recognise a warning and take appropriate action -Warning signs are clear and reliable; the child can recognise a warning and have enough time to make themselves safe etc.
  • Have no warning -They have no warnings or warnings are unreliable.
  • Have had a serious injury in the last 6 months because of a fit, blackout, or seizure? A serious injury may be concussion, a cut, they may have bitten themselves, bad bruising or been hospitalised.
  • Display dangerous behaviour after a fit, blackout or seizure.
  • The child may be confused, upset, exhausted, dizzy, sick, and aggressive after a seizure and need time to recover. This could be 1 hour or 1 day.

You will also need to tell them...

  • The number of days affected each month; -When putting in numbers try to work out an average. If you have a child who on a good day/night fits once but on a bad day/night fits 10 times put down around 5 times.
  • How many fits they have on these days
  • The number of nights affected each month
  • How many fits they have on these nights
  • Have they had an episode of status epilepticus in the past 12 months?
  • Persistent epileptic activity for more than 30 minutes or continued seizures without regaining consciousness.

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • Is there a particular time of day the child has them?
  • The child loses consciousness, has convulsions or becomes incontinent.
  • They need monitoring e.g. how long they are fitting for each time.
  • Child may be very anxious about having a fit, blackout, seizure and need lots of support and reassurance.
  • You may have to make the environment safe before, during and after the child has a seizure, fit etc.
  • Child needs looking after and to be made comfortable after an attack.
  • Do they need watching over during the day/night in case of a fit, blackout, seizure?
  • Medication has to be administered.
  • Clothes may need to be changed afterwards.

DLA Q.49 – Supervision

carers allowance

Do they need to be supervised during the day to keep safe?

If your child needs supervising because of how they feel or behave, or how they react to people, changing situations and things around them please tick ‘yes’ at the top of the page under question 49. Only tick no if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

Answer ‘no’ if they cannot...

  • Recognise and react to common dangers - Cannot behave safely around cookers, knives etc. Child is unable to read and understand warning signs and signals.
  • Cope with planned changes to daily routine - Even if given notice of changes in routine child reacts badly, routines cannot be changed easily with prior notice.
  • Cope with unplanned changes to daily routine - Any changes to routine cannot be coped with, it is hard to make changes to routine without serious consequences, distress, anger etc.

Please note phrasing of question has now changed. Answer ‘yes’ if they regularly...

  • Feel anxious or panicky - Worry about things that would not normally bother other children.
  • Become upset or frustrated - Get upset and frustrated over things other children wouldn’t. Struggle to understand things or get their point across.
  • Try to harm themselves or others - Banging head against things, biting, pinching, scratching, hitting themselves etc.
  • Feel someone may harm them - A fear of being alone with and meeting different people, paranoia, attachment disorders.
  • Become verbally, physically aggressive or destructive - Shouting and swearing. Hitting, kicking, pulling hair, punching and biting. Throwing and hitting with the use of objects.
  • Act impulsively - Running off, unpredictable behaviour.
  • Have tantrums - Get very angry, refuse to listen to what is being said, ignoring instructions, are uncooperative, and cry/scream uncontrollably for prolonged periods of time.

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • Journeys may have to be rearranged or avoided due to planned and unplanned changes to routine.
  • They may over exert themselves which could have serious consequences.
  • Have a physical disability and need supervision to ensure safety and enable certain activities.
  • They may behave dangerously/aggressively towards other children and adults. Has a lack of danger awareness e.g. no fear of heights, hot things, sharp things.
  • Child may be a danger to themselves and others around them.
  • Any falls cuts or bumps could have serious consequences.
  • They self-harm, for example banging their head against a wall or pulling their hair out.
  • You have to offer comfort, support or reassurance when they are upset or frustrated.
  • Child may express withdrawn behaviour and/or become isolated.
  • Child’s basic needs would not be met.
  • Child may become emotionally distressed.
  • Child needs continual supervision, a substantial amount more than a typically developing child of the same age.

DLA Q.50 –Development

Disability Living Allowance Development

Do they need extra help with their development?

If your child gets any extra help they need to improve their understanding of people and their surroundings please tick yes at the top of the page under question 50. Only tick no if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

Answer ‘yes’ if they need help to...

  • Understand the world around them - Explain things in a variety of ways, need to provide lots of support and encouragements as the child regularly feels confused or does not take an interest in the world around them.
  • Recognise their surroundings - Need assistance and prompting as they are often confused and disorientated, they struggle to remember places or notice things around them.
  • Follow instructions - Need things to be explained in short clear sentences. Spend time explaining things in different ways.
  • Play with others - Need help and encouragement to interact with others physically, socially and communicatively. Assist with rules and monitor behaviour.
  • Play on their own - They need encouragement to play in a more varied and stimulating way. Help them to use play equipment and explain play activities in a variety of ways.
  • Join in activities with others - Need help interacting with others, for example playing games and -group learning exercises.
  • Behave appropriately - Need help to understand social situations, they often act inappropriately e.g. invade personal space, try and touch people, have tantrums and melt downs, can be verbally aggressive/inappropriate.
  • Understand other people’s behaviour - Need help to interpret what others mean or want, often get mixed messages, take things the wrong way or are left out due to a lack of understanding.

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • Physical/sensory/learning/social/play skills are delayed.
  • Have difficulty manipulating objects e.g. holding, kicking or throwing things.
  • Need help learning to read write or do simple maths, may need extra help with school work.
  • Play obsessively and repetitively.
  • Play games that are for much younger children.
  • Dominate others, play wildly and dangerously.
  • Child does not understand how to play e.g. rules and turn taking.
  • Have a lack of danger awareness e.g. no fear of heights, traffic safety.
  • They need extra help to learn and practice new skills.
  • Need encouragement to play in a more varied and stimulating way.
  • Someone to help facilitate play, explain rules and help the child engage and interact with others.
  • The child has to learn different skills such as signing instead of speaking.
  • Without additional support they would develop much more slowly and not be able to take part in things.
  • Child would become emotionally distressed.
  • Would be physically unable to practice new skills.
  • Would find it difficult to learn new skills.
  • Might be bullied or become isolated.
  • Prefers to be alone, cannot socialise with others.

DLA Q.51 – At school or nursery

ks2 english

If your child needs encouragement, prompting or physical help at school or nursery tick ‘yes’ at the top of the page under question 51. Only tick no if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

Answer ‘yes’ if they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to...

  • Go to and use the toilet - The child needs help with toileting needs, including physical help, preparation, supervision, encouragement. Help managing clothes, reminding them to go, checking they have cleaned themselves etc.
  • Safely move between lessons - Need assistance to find their way as they get confused and disorientated, physical help to move around, supervision and encouragement to ensure they do not get hurt or distracted.
  • Change into different clothes for PE and other school activities - They cannot change on their own and need help with buttons, zips, laces etc. Changing can take a long time and they need prompting and encouraging. They need reassuring as they get anxious and upset about getting changed.
  • Eat meals - They need to be encouraged to eat, monitoring for special dietary requirements or to make sure they eat the right things, help manipulating cutlery and cutting food up.
  • Take medicine or do therapy - The child needs help with medicine/therapy e.g knowing when and how to take/do it, applying creams, changing dressing etc. including physical help, preparation, supervision, encouragement.
  • Communicate - The child has difficulty and needs extra help passing on information, asking and answering questions, telling people how they feel and giving and following instructions.
  • What extra help do they need with learning? - They need help with reading, writing and simple maths. They have difficulty concentrating and staying on task. Things need to be written down, in pictures or another adapted format. They are put into smaller groups, instructions are simple and repeated.
  • What is their behaviour like at school or nursery? -They get upset and frustrated. They don’t have many friends and are lonely/isolated. They have to follow a very strict and rigid routine. They get angry and aggressive, they have been excluded or have to be removed from classes.
  • How do they usually get to and from school or nursery? - You walk with them, take them in the car, they go on a school bus, walk with siblings/friends etc.

Anything  else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • What type of school are they at?
  • They have one to one support from a teacher or teaching assistant.
  • They have a buddy at school to help them move around.
  • They have an IEP, Statement, EHCP or are on School Action, School Action Plus or a form of specialised curriculum.
  • They have social communication lessons/support at school.
  • They do certain lessons in a special unit or area e.g. a resource unit.
  • A safe space they can go to if they need to.
  • Help expressing themselves or communicating so they can learn more efficiently.
  • Aids and adaptions such as specialised glasses, laptops, pens etc. so they can learn more easily.
  • They attend special after school clubs.
  • Additional support is provided in exams and for homework.

DLA Q.52 – Hobbies and Activities

Disability Living Allowance Hobbies

Do they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to take part in hobbies, social or religious activities?

If your child gets any extra help with hobbies and activities please tick ‘yes’ at the top of the page under question 52. These can be hobbies and activities that they are already doing, or things they would like to do if they had the help they needed.  tick no if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

Activity examples - Help needed, use this column to decide how often each day and how long each time the child needs help with tasks on the left.

At home

Painting, drawing, arts and crafts, playing with toys, playing in the garden, riding a bike, cooking and baking, messy play, imaginary play, playing board games, interacting with other children, watching films or cartoons. Encouragement to use equipment, help getting equipment set up, motivation to keep interested, facilitation of play, help explaining and understanding games and rules, supervision for safety reasons, help or encouragement to clean up after themselves, help doing the activity e.g. using scissors or lifting things.

  • Is this something they do or would do every day if they had the help?
  • If not, how many times a week would they like to be able to do this activity.
  • How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

When they go out

Dance classes, the play park, go to the cinema, soft play areas, swimming, after school clubs, drama clubs, visiting friends, day trips, church, holidays, shopping for pleasure, playing outdoors, going to the library, brownies, cubs, scouts etc.

A lot of the help needed will be the same as above, however also think about Help getting to the activity or hobby, supervision and help with care needs when out e.g. reminding them to go to the toilet, help them with eating etc. staying with them during the activity, simple instruction or one to one support in clubs and classes, help with communication.

Remember to include time needed for encouragement, accompanying them there, and refusal episodes or tantrums.

How often each day and how long each time (mins)?

DLA Q.53 – Help and supervision during the night

Disability Living Allowance Sleeping

Do they wake and need help at night, or need someone to be awake and watch over them at night?

If your child gets any extra help and supervision at night please tick yes at the top of the page under question 53. Only tick no if you have read the boxes and examples on the form and have decided you don’t have such problems.

During the night, when everyone in the house is in bed e.g. once the carer has gone to bed…

How often each day and how long for (use this column to decide how often each day and how long each time the child needs help with each task)

Fill in timings if they need encouragement, prompting or physical help to...

  • Get into, get out of or turn in bed - Include physically helping the child turning, get into or out of bed, and encouraging/prompting the child to turn, get into or out of bed.
  • The amount of time it takes from deciding it is time to get the child into, out of or turn them until it has been done (including following a routine or refusals).
  • How often each night and ow long each time (mins)?

 

Get to and use the toilet, manage nappies or pads

  • All the times during the night that the child needs help with toileting needs, including physical help, preparation, supervision, encouragement, changing bed sheets and clothing etc.
  • The time it takes from the child first identifying a toileting need (including checking, any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child’s needs are complete (including any refusal episodes).
  • How often each night day and how long each time (mins)?

Have treatment

  • All times during the night that the child needs help with treatment e.g. medication, creams changing dressing, therapy etc. including physical help, preparation, supervision, encouragement.
  • The time it takes for the child to have treatment including any prior prompting and encouragement) until the child has taken it (including any refusal episodes).
  • How often each night and how long each time (mins)?

Settle or re- settle

  • Settle the child during the night, do not include when you first settle them in bed as this is included in question 35.
  • The amount of time it takes from when the child is put back in bed until they are settled and starting to fall asleep.
  • How often each night and how long each time (mins)?

Fill in the timings if they need watching over because they...

  • Are unaware of danger and may harm themselves or others - Child is unaware of dangers such as water hazards, sharp objects, heights, plugs etc. They may put themselves or others in harm’s way if not supervised.
  • How often each night and how long each time (mins)?

May wander about

  • During the night the child does not stay in bed. They wander around the house, upstairs and downstairs they may try to get outside. They need to be supervised to ensure this doesn’t happen.
  • How often each night and how long each time (mins)?

Have behavioural problems

  • The child gets upset, aggressive, destructive, has tantrums, shouts, becomes anxious during the night and needs someone to watch over them. (Include comforting and reassuring the child)
  • How often each night and how long each time (mins)?

 

Anything else you want to tell them? Use the suggestions below to help fill in the additional information box at the bottom of the claim form…

  • The child does not go to sleep until very late and needs watching over.
  • The child wakes up very early in the morning before everyone else is awake and needs supervision or help.
  • The child has problems sleeping/sleep disorders such as sleep walking, night terrors, sleep apnoea, nightmares, intermittent sleep etc.
  • The child needs turning to avoid bed sores.
  • Need to be moved or have bed sheets adjusted as they cannot do it themselves.
  • The child cannot move around, get into or out of bed without help.
  • They suffer pain and discomfort at night time.
  • Temperature needs to be monitored as they can’t do this themselves e.g. they may not remove covers even though  they are very hot.
  • They have episodes of incontinence or have to be helped with toileting needs during the night.
  • The child regularly has accidents and bed clothes and sheets need changing or cleaning.
  • The child has therapy during the night.
  • The child has to have medication or food given to them during the night (include tube feeding).
  • Need watching over because of medical reasons, fits etc.
  • They get upset; have lots of anxiety at night time and need lots of comforting and reassurance.
  • The child wakes throughout the night and cannot resettle themselves.
  • Need constant supervision when not asleep as they may harm themselves or someone else.
  • The child would be unable to sleep without help, supervision and encouragement.
  • The child needs to be monitored/supervised because of the danger of epileptic seizures.

DLA Q.54 - Q.71

Most of these questions are just simple yes or no answers, so we have just listed a few here, with a few hints and tips where needed…

Q.54

If you want to tell us anything else about their care needs, use the box below – If there is anything you haven’t had room to explain in questions 37-53 it’s important that you use this box to do so, and reference your comments back to the relevant question.

Q.55

When did the child’s care needs you have told us about start? – The date when you first noticed that your child had care needs greatly in excess of typically developing children of their own age. This may be from birth in some cases, later in others.

Q.70

Extra information – This can be used as a continuation box for anything you couldn’t fit in to questions 35 or 54, or to tell the DWP anything else you think is relevant to the claim that hasn’t been covered in the rest of the form. You can continue on a separate piece of paper. Remember though that they won’t have time to read large amounts so it’s best to be as brief but specific as possible.

DLA Q.71 – Declaration. Don’t forget to sign and date the form before you send it in!

Once completed….

Read through the form before you send it.

  • Have you included enough information?
  • Have you answered all the relevant questions?
  • Are your contact details correct?
  • Have you missed anything?
  • Is the professionals’ evidence complete?

Keep a copy of the form and any supporting evidence for your records. You might need it if you are unhappy with your award and wish to challenge the decision. It will also help you when the claim is due for renewal or if you want to apply for a different rate later on.

Reward yourself when the form is finished. Filling in the DLA form can be time consuming, and because you’re concentrating on the things your child can’t do, stressful and demoralising. But if you get the DLA it will be worth it in the end.

lovehearts_find-me

DLA

All about DLA for your child. Tonnes of useful advice!

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How to appeal

How do you appeal a decision.

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Find Legal Help

Find lots of free and low cost help for your child.

Not sure where to turn?

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Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Looking for something else?

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

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Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

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Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

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Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

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Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Direct payments

direct payments

If you or someone you care for get help from social services, then you can apply for direct payments. These extra payments let you choose and buy the services you need yourself, instead of getting them from your council.

So, if you use a trained babysitter or 'respite carer' to babysit or do days out with your SEN or disabled child then you might be able to get a special budget to pay for it. This budget is called a direct payment.

The Assessment

You can only get direct payments if you’ve been assessed by your social services department. The assessments are usually done at home. A disability social worker will go through your day to day activities and put together a care plan detailing what you need.

Sometimes, you can find the assessment criteria for your local social services department online. It might be a good idea to 'Google it' and have a look through the document in advance to see if you might be eligible.

During the assessment, take notes of what is being said as well as the assessors contact details and name. You could always send your notes via email after the meeting and thank them for their time. That way, everybody feels like they're working together as a team.

Who are Direct Payments for?

You might be able to get Direct payments if you are a...

  • disabled person aged 16 or over (with short or long-term needs)
  • a disabled parent for children’s services
  • carers aged 16 or over including people with parental responsibility for a disabled child.
  • elderly people who need community care services

How do I Apply for Direct Payments?

To receive direct payments, you first need to contact your local council or trust to ask them to assess your care needs. How much you get depends on your financial circumstances, and you might need to top it up with money of your own. APPLY HERE for Direct Payments.

How do direct payments work?

Direct payments go straight into your bank, post office, building society or other savings account. The council have to agree in advance what you spend your personal budget on. This can be changes as your circumstances and needs change.

You might to be able to use direct payments for...

  • short breaks
  • help to go to a youth club or other activity
  • personal care

Remember that this is all about a partnership between you and the professionals involved to make the right decisions for you as a family.

 

Direct Payments are not automatic!

Call your social services department or disability social worker to talk through you options.

Sky Badger knows that finding help is tricky, so please look through Sky Badger's website to find even more support for your whole family.

The Good News...

Direct Payments can bring you more independence and choice in how you manage care.

  • you will take control of your own care and support services.
  • you will have more choice in selecting the services and support tailored to your needs.
  • If you're confident with money and paperwork this is definitely for you, if not, you can still get support.
  • If you're great at keeping receipts and invoices and love getting  reports and paperwork to your direct payment team on time.

The Not So Good News...

This might not be for you is...

  • you don't like the idea of being an employer – that's what direct payments require you to be.
  • you’re not goos at keeping records and receipts.
  • if you or the person you're caring for you spends frequent or long periods of time in hospital.
  • if you’re happy letting your local authority provide you with care services you need.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Personal Independence Payment

What is a P.I.P.?

The Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is a benefit that helps you with the extra costs of having a disability or having a long-term health conditions. It is for people aged 16 to 64. The PIP is not a means tested benefit.

You'll find a great step-by-step guide to filling in the form on this page. Scroll down to the end of the page for lots more information about how to apply, how to appeal a decision and find lots of other organisations that can help you with your PIP application process.

Children under 16

You can’t make a claim for PIP for children under 16. For existing DLA for child claims the DWP will contact you  when your child is 15 years and 7 months old.

PIP Allowance

If you’re aged 16 to 64 you could get between £23.60 and £151.40 a week by claiming Personal Independence Payment (PIP). The amount you get depends on how your condition affects you, not the condition itself.

personal independence payment phone number

Telephone: 0800 917 2222
Textphone: 0800 917 7777
Calling from abroad: +44 191 218 7766
Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm

How is it Scored?

How does the PIP get scored and how many points do you need?

PIP is made up of 2 parts, the daily living component and the mobility component. Each component can be paid at one of 2 rates, either the standard rate or the enhanced rate. You need at least 8 points to get the standard rate or 12 points to get the enhanced rate of PIP. You will qualify for one of these if  you need is great enough. The 'points' in each section range from 0-12 depending on the severity of need.

Component Weekly rate
Daily living - standard rate £59.70
Daily living - enhanced rate £89.15
Mobility - standard rate £23.60
Mobility - enhanced rate £62.25

In our step-by step guide below, you'll find charts explaining how the points are awarded.

pip

How to claim PIP

You can make a new Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claim by calling the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). Someone else can call on your behalf, but you’ll need to be with them when they call. There are also other ways to claim if you find it difficult to use a telephone. The process is different in Northern Ireland.

Appointees

If a person can’t do things like tell the DWP if their condition gets better or worse, or about changes in address or bank details and so on, another person may need to act on their behalf, as their ‘Appointee’. This must be because of their illness or disability and not just because they are still a young person. Chat to the DWP on the number below to set someone else up as an appointee.

Claim by calling:

Telephone: 0345 850 3322
Textphone: 0345 601 6677

Before you call, you’ll need:

  • your contact details, for example telephone number
  • your date of birth
  • your National Insurance number - this is on letters about tax, pensions and benefits
  • your bank or building society account number and sort code
  • your doctor or health worker’s name, address and telephone number
  • dates and addresses for any time you’ve spent abroad, in a care home or hospital

Carers are currently providing care worth £132 billion...which is the same as the entire NHS budget!

How do I fill in the form?

A Step-by-Step Guide to Filling in your Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Form

As soon as your form arrives, put on the kettle and work through our guide. It does take ages but we'll do our best to help you one question at a time.

personal independence payment

PIP Q.1 - List all the professionals that you see because of your conditions.

These can include your GP, hospital doctor, specialists nurse, community psychiatric nurse, occupational therapist, teachers, SENco, educational psychologist, physiotherapist, social worker, counsellor, or support worker. Say when you last saw them and include their contact details.

PIP Q2. Conditions & Medications

PIP Q2a - List all of your physical and mental health conditions and disabilities and say when they were diagnosis. If you’re not sure, just put down the year.

PIP Q2b - List all of the medications you’re taking and at what dose. Include any treatments you’re having or will be having and any side effects they have on you.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

...and while you're working hard on your PIP application, we wondered if there is anything else we can tell you about?

PIP Q3 - Preparing Food

This question is about if you can prepare a meal for yourself. Can you do things like peeling, chopping or opening packaging? Can you use a hob, oven or microwave oven safely?

PIP Q3a – What other help from an aid or appliance do you need to prepare and cook a simple meal for yourself? Do you need things like perching stools, lightweight pots and pans, easy grip handles on utensils, single lever arm taps and liquid level indicators?

PIP Q3b - Do you need help from another person to prepare or cook a simple meal?
Do they remind you or motivate you to cook? Do they plan the task for you? Do they supervise you, help you physically or do they prepare all your food for you?

PIP Q3c - Extra information - Preparing Food

Write down anything else about how you find preparing food tricky because of your condition. How are you managing now? How long does preparing a meal take? What help do you need? Is it safe for you to cook? Are you in pain or do you get tired?

 

Preparing Food Points
Can prepare and cook a simple meal unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal. 2
Cannot cook a simple meal using a conventional cooker but is able to do so using a microwave. 2
Needs prompting to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. For example: you lack motivation to prepare and cook a simple meal on the majority of days due to a mental health condition, or need to be reminded how to prepare and cook food on the majority of days. 2
Needs supervision or assistance to either prepare or cook a simple meal. You may need supervision to safely heat or cook food using a microwave oven; or to claimants who cannot safely prepare vegetables, even with an aid or appliance. In cases of a risk of self-harm, there should be good evidence of the risk. 4
Cannot prepare and cook food. 8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q4 - Eating and drinking

This question is about how you eat and drink because of you condition(s).

Do you remember to Eat? Do you need help cutting up your food? Can you put food and drink into your own mouth and can you chew and swallow?

PIP Q4a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to eat and drink - like weighted cups or adapted cutlery?

PIP Q4b – Do you use a feeding tube or similar device to eat or drink - like a feeding tube with a rate limiting device as a delivery system or feed pump?

PIP Q4c – Do you need help from another person to eat and drink? Does someone have to remind or encourage you to eat? Do they supervise you? Do they physically help you to eat and drink or do they manage your feeding tube?

PIP Q4d - Extra information - Eating and drinking

 

Eating and drinking Points
Can take nutrition unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to take nutrition; or ii. supervision to be able to take nutrition; or assistance to be able to cut up food. 2
Needs a therapeutic source to be able to take nutrition. You may require enteral or parenteral feeding but can carry it out unaided. 2
Needs prompting to be able to take nutrition. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. 4
Needs assistance to be able to manage a therapeutic source to take nutrition. 6
Cannot convey food and drink to their mouth and needs another person to do so. 10

 

PIP Q5 – Managing treatments

This section is about how tricky you find it to manage your treatments, monitor your condition and stop yourself getting worse. That might include monitoring your blood sugar level or noticing changes in mental state and pain levels.

Q5a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to monitor your health conditions or take medication or manage home treatments? E.g. Do you use a Dosette Box for tablets.

Q5b – Do you need help from another person to remind you to take medications and treatment? Does someone supervise you while you take your medication? Do they physically help you take medication or manage treatments?

Q5c – Extra information - Managing treatments. Chat about the good days and the bad ones. Do you have any side effects that make managing your medication tricky?

 

Managing treatments Points
Does not receive medication or therapy or need to monitor a health condition; or can manage medication or therapy or monitor a health condition unaided. 0
Needs either to use an aid or appliance to be able to manage medication; or supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage medication or monitor a health condition. Eg. You might need help opening bottles or taking pills out of blister packs; help interpreting or reading blood sugar for the correct dose of medication; supervision to ensure the medication is taken properly; prompting to remind the claimant to take medication at the appropriate time(s). 1
Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes no more than 3.5 hours a week. 2
Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 3.5 but no more than 7 hours a week. 4
Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 7 but no more than 14 hours a week. 6
Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 14 hours a week. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. For example, a claimant needs 15 minutes of assistance with therapy each day Monday to Friday, or reminding to manage 8
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PIP Q6 – Washing and bathing

How does you condition affect you taking a bath or showering? Can you wash your body, limbs, face, underarms and hair and can you use a standard bath or shower?

Q6a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to wash and bathe yourself, including using a bath or shower? Aids and appliances include things like a bath / shower seat or grab rails.

Q6b – Do you need help from another person to wash and bathe? Do they physically help you? Do they remind you when to wash and bathe and do they watch over you to make sure you are safe?

Q6c – Extra information - Washing and bathing

Tell us more about any difficulties you have when washing and bathing like risks including accidents a safety, the time it takes and if you have pain, breathlessness or get really tired.

 

 

Washing and bathing Points
Can wash and bathe unaided. You can wash and bath unaided, including getting in to and out of both an unadapted bath and unadapted shower. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to wash or bathe. E.g. a long-handled sponge, shower seat or bath rail. 2
Needs supervision or prompting to be able to wash or bathe. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. 2
Needs assistance to be able to wash either their hair, or body below the waist. 2
Needs assistance to be able to get in or out of a bath or shower. 3
Needs assistance to be able to wash their body between the shoulders and waist. 4
Cannot wash and bathe at all and needs another person to wash their entire body. 8

 

PIP Q7 – Managing toilet needs

 

Talk about if  you can get on or off a standard toilet, and clean yourself after using the toilet. Can you manage emptying your bowel and bladder? Do you need a collecting device such as a bottle, bucket or catheter?

PIP Q7a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to use the toilet or manage incontinence like commodes, raised toilet seats, bottom wipers, bidets, incontinence pads or a stoma bag?

PIP Q7b – Do you need help from another person to use the toilet or manage incontinence? Do they physically help you? Do they remind you when to use the toilet or do they watch over you to make sure you are safe?

PIP Q7c – Extra information - Managing toilet needs

Say how long it takes you to complete this activity. Is it different day to day? Tell them about good and bad days. Are you incontinent? How you manage it?

 

Managing toilet needs Points
Can manage toilet needs or incontinence unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to manage toilet needs or incontinence. 2
Needs supervision or prompting to be able to manage toilet needs. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. 2
Needs assistance to be able to manage toilet needs. E.g. If you require assistance to get on and off the toilet and/or to clean themselves afterwards, but 4
Needs assistance to be able to manage incontinence of either bladder or bowel. 6
Needs assistance to be able to manage incontinence of both bladder and bowel. 8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q8 – Dressing and undressing

In this section, you can talk about how your condition affects you putting on and taking off clothes, including shoes and socks. Do you know when to put on or take off clothes, and can you choose clothes that are appropriate?

PIP Q8a – Do you use an aid or appliance to dress or undress like modified buttons, front fastening bras, velcro fastening, shoe aids or an audio colour detector?

PIP Q8b – Do you need help from another person to dress or undress? Do they physically help you? Do they select your clothes for the weather, the occasion or the time of day? Do they tell you when to dress and undress or do they remind you when to change your clothes?

PIP Q8c – Extra Information - Dressing and undressing

Add anything here that helps explain how else your condition affects you doing this activity like how long it takes you to dress and undress or if only have difficulty dressing certain parts of your body?

Dressing and undressing Points
Can dress and undress unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to dress or undress. E.g. modified buttons and shoe aids. 2
Needs either prompting to be able to dress, undress or determine appropriate circumstances for remaining clothed; or prompting or assistance to be able to select appropriate clothing. 2
Needs assistance to be able to dress or undress their lower body. 2
Needs assistance to be able to dress or undress their upper body. 4
Cannot dress or undress at all. 8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q9 – Communicating

How does your condition affect you communicating? That includes your speech, hearing or how you understand what is being said to you. (In your native language).

 

PIP Q9a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance to communicate with others like a hearing and voice aids, picture symbols or other assistive computer technology?

PIP Q9b – Do you need help from another person to communicate with others?
Do they help you understand what people are saying? Do you have someone who helps you by interpreting speech into sign language or do they help you by speaking on your behalf?

PIP Q9c – Extra information - Communicating

Mention it here if you have Tourette’s syndrome, Asperger’s or autism and find it difficult to communicate or if your medication has side effects that make it difficult to communicate. Does communicating cause anxiety and distress?

Communicating Points
Can express and understand verbal information unaided. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to speak or hear. E.g. You might require a hearing aid or an electro larynx. 2
Needs communication support to be able to express or understand complex verbal information. E.g. You may require a sign language interpreter. 4
Needs communication support to be able to express or understand basic verbal information. E.g. You may require a sign language interpreter. 8
Cannot express or understand verbal information at all even with communication support. 12


 

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PIP Q10 – Reading

This section is about how you read normal sized text and understand signs, symbols and words (in your native language). You should also talk about if you have problems concentrating when you read. Talk about how you read and understand signs, symbols and words written or printed in your native language, not braille. How you understanding numbers, including dates and other day to day reading like timetables.

PIP Q10a – Do you need to use an aid or appliance other than spectacles or contact lenses to read signs, symbols and words like magnifiers or need to take breaks?

PIP Q10b – Do you need help from another person to read or understand signs, symbols and words? Does somebody else need to read or explain signs and symbols to you because you have a learning disability or a mental health problem?

PIP Q10c – Extra information - Reading

Write about how how your condition affects your writing. How long does it take you to write a letter?

Reading Points
Can read and understand basic and complex written information either unaided or using spectacles or contact lenses. 0
Needs to use an aid or appliance, other than spectacles or contact lenses, to be able to read or understand either basic or complex written information. E.g. You may require vision aids. 2
Needs prompting to be able to read or understand complex written information. 2
Needs prompting to be able to read or understand basic written information. 4
Cannot read or understand signs, symbols or words at all. E.g. You may require another person to read everything for them due to a learning disability or severe visual impairment. 8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q11 – Mixing with other people

This question is about how you get on with other people face-to-face, either individually or as part of a group. Do you understand how they're behaving towards you, and can you behave appropriately towards them?

PIP Q11a – Do you need another person to help you to mix with other people? Does someone else need to encourage you to mix with other people? Does someone help you understand how people are behaving and how to behave yourself because you have a learning disability or mental heath problem?

PIP Q11b – Do you find it difficult or stressful to meet other people?

PIP Q11c – Extra information - Mixing with other people

Explain any stress, anxiety or confusion you feel around meeting people. Do you need help to stay safe? Do you have good days and bad ones? How do they differ?

Mixing with other people Points
Can engage with other people unaided. 0
Needs prompting to be able to engage with other people. ‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. For example: may apply to people who need encouragement to engage with others in the presence of a third party. 2
Needs social support to be able to engage with other people. 4
Cannot engage with other people due to such engagement causing either –

i. overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant; or ii. the claimant to exhibit behaviour which would result in a substantial risk of harm to the claimant or another person. ‘Overwhelming psychological distress’ means distress related to an enduring mental health condition or intellectual or cognitive impairment which results in a severe anxiety state in which the symptoms are so severe that the person is unable to function. This may occur in conditions such as generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, dementia or agoraphobia.

8

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q12 – Making decisions about money

This section is about how you manage money. Do you understand how much things costs? How much change you should get and how to manage budgets? Can you understand how to pay bills and plan?

PIP Q12a – Do you need someone else to help you to understand how much things cost when you buy them or how much change you'll receive? Do you need someone to do it for you or do they need to remind you to do it or how to do it? Do you need someone to help you understand?

PIP Q12b – Do you need someone else to help you manage your household budgets, pay bills or plan future purchases? Do you need someone to do it for you or do they have to help you manage your bills? Do you need encouragement and help to do it?

PIP Q12c – Extra information - Making decisions about money

How your condition affects you understanding money? Do you have a learning disability that makes understanding money difficult?

 Making decisions about money Points
Can manage complex budgeting decisions unaided. 0
Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make complex budgeting decisions. 2
Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make simple budgeting decisions. 4
Cannot make any budgeting decisions at all. 6

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q13 – Going out

This section is about how your condition makes it tricky to go out. That includes how to plan and follow a route, follow a train and bus timetable or if you have severe anxiety or stress prevents you from going out.

PIP Q13a – Do you need help from another person to plan a route to somewhere you know well? Do you need someone to help you plan a route, or plan it for you? Do you have an assistance dog or specialist aid, such as a white stick? Do you find it difficult or stressful to handle change? Do you have a mental condition that makes travelling difficult? Do you need somebody with you to stay safe?

PIP Q13b – Do you need help getting to somewhere you don't know well?

Just like in the previous question about travelling to a familiar place this question asks about the same challenges but for an unfamiliar place. Is an unfamiliar journey different in terms of the challenges it presents to you?

PIP Q13c – Are you unable to go out because of severe anxiety or distress?

PIP Q13d – Extra information - Going out

Talk about tell us how your condition affects you going out if you. Talk about any orientation aids you use. Do you have good days and bad days? Do you feel anxious, fearful or nervous? Are you at risk of accidents, injury or do you get lost?

 Going out Points
Can plan and follow the route of a journey unaided. 0
Needs prompting to be able to undertake any journey to avoid overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant. ‘Overwhelming psychological distress’ means distress related to an enduring mental health condition or intellectual or cognitive impairment which results in a severe anxiety state in which the symptoms are so severe that the person is 4
For reasons other than psychological distress, cannot plan the route of a journey. 8
For reasons other than psychological distress, cannot follow the route of an unfamiliar journey without another person, assistance dog or orientation aid. 10 points. 10
Cannot undertake any journey because it would cause overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant. 10
For reasons other than psychological distress, cannot follow the route of a familiar journey without another person, an assistance dog or an orientation aid. 12

 

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

PIP Q14 – Moving around

This question is about you standing safely without help and if you can walk safely

PIP Q14a – How far can you walk taking into account any aids you use? To give you an idea of distance, 50 metres is approximately 5 buses parked end to end.

PIP Q14b – Do you use an aid or appliance to walk? Walking aids include walking sticks, walking frames, crutches, and prostheses.

PIP Q14c – Do you use a wheelchair or similar device to move around safely, reliably and repeatedly and in a reasonable time period?

PIP Q14d – Extra information - Moving Around

Talk about any aids you use, rest breaks you need, pain, the time it takes to move around, accidents and other risks. Do you need someone to help you? Do you regularly fall? Do you find it difficult to move around on certain ground surfaces? Do you use a wheelchair? Is it motorised or manual? Do you experience any other difficulties, either during or after the activity, like pain, breathlessness, tiredness, dizziness or anxiety?

Moving around Points
Can stand and then move more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided. 0
Can stand and then move more than 50 metres but no more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided. For example, this would include people who can stand and move more than 50 metres but no further than 200 metres either by themselves, or using an aid or appliance such as a stick or crutch, or with support from another person. 4
Can stand and then move unaided more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres. For example, this would include people who can stand and move more than 20 metres but no further than 50 metres, without needing to rely on an aid or appliance such as a walking stick, or help from another person. 8
Can stand and then move using an aid or appliance more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres. For example, this would include people who can stand and move more than 20 metres but no further than 50 metres, but need to use an aid or appliance, such as a stick or crutch to do so. 10
Can stand and then move more than 1 metre but no more than 20 metres, either aided or unaided. For example, a person who can stand and move more than 1 metre, but no further than 20 metres, either unaided or with the use of an aid or appliance such as a stick or crutch, or support from another person. 12
Cannot, either aided or unaided – i. stand; or ii. move more than 1 metre. 12

 

PIP Q15 – Additional information

This page is blank. Add any more information in here or on a separate page with your name and national insurance number at the top.

Add any reports from you family or carers here too....and that's just about it! You've definitely learnt another cup of tea.

 

Top Tips...

  • Get all of your professional reports as early as possible.
  • If you use information in the reports to give evidence of need in your form, then reference it and highlight relevant sections in the reports when you attache them.
  • If you're not confident hand writing your form, don't worry. You can answer pretty much everything by using separate pieces of paper that you attach to the form. Remember you MUST put the claimant's name and national insurance number at the top of each page.
  • Photocopy everything! You don't want to have to do the whole thing again.

When you've finished your form, post it off in the envelope provided.

You’ll then probably have to have an assessment to complete your Personal Independence Payment (PIP) application. This will be a meeting with a health professional who will write a report and send it to the DWP. You need to prepare for the meeting in advance. Happily, there's a fabulous guide from Citizens Advice HERE that will help you prepare.

DWP's intro to PIP's

This website includes an overview, details about eligibility, what you'll get, how to claim and what to do if your circumstances change.

Citizens Advice Bureau - PIP Language

This guide to the language used in the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessment criteria. Whether you can get PIP depends on an assessment of your ability to carry out certain daily living activities and mobility activities. This is measured against a list of descriptors, which describe varying levels of ability under each activity.

Challenging a PIP decision

A CAB guide to appealing against the decision made about your PIP claim.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

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Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Disabled Bills

Disabled bills & Council Tax Discounts

disabled council tax and disabled bills

HELP WITH YOUR BILLS

Having a child with additional needs can add to the costs to running your home and also reduce your income because of your caring responsibilities. Thats why there are lots of support systems in place to help level the playing field and help you support your child without worrying about how to pay the bills.

GAS & ELECTRICITY BILLS

Some gas and electricity suppliers have set up funds that give grants if you're in financial hardship because of fuel costs. Your supplier will let you know what's available. Some charities, such as Macmillan, also make grants towards fuel costs. Even if you fall behind in your payments, you shouldn't have your electricity or gas supply cut off during the winter months especially if your home has someone who is disabled living there or if you have a child under 18 living with you.

COLD WEATHER PAYMENTS

Check that you are receiving the Cold Weather Payment. You may be eligible because your child's disability. You’ll get a Cold Weather Payment if the average temperature in your area is recorded or forecast to be zero degrees celsius or below for 7 consecutive days.

WATER BILLS

Some water companies can offer you help from their charitable trust schemes, so contact your water company for more information.

 The WaterSure scheme is available to families on certain benefits who have a water meter. It will allow those families to have their bills capped so they won't get a massive bill out of the blue. To find out more, have a look at the OFWAT website.

COUNCIL TAX DISCOUNT

You can get a discount on your Council Tax if your child needs extra space or an additional bathroom because of their disability. Your bill will be reduced to the next Council Tax band down. For example, a C property will be charged at a B rate. Even if your property is in Band A (the lowest band) you will still receive a reduction.

 Contact your local authority for more information.

Finding the right Discounts for Council Tax Bills

There are three different kinds of council tax reductions that you should know about...

  • The disability reduction scheme
  • The single person’s discount
  • Low income and hardship funds
  • The Disability Reduction Scheme

If someone in your household is ‘substantially and permanently disabled’ you may qualify for a reduction in the banding of your council tax bill.

Who qualifies?

There must be a disabled person or child living in your property and one of the following must apply....

  • Wheelchair - They use a wheelchair indoors
  • Extra bathroom or kitchen - That you have a second bathroom or

    kitchen in your home that is needed by your disabled child.

  • Extra room - Your child’s disability is such that one of the rooms in your property (other than a bathroom, kitchen or toilet, and in addition to their own bedroom) is needed by and mostly used by them. Possibly an adapted room, a treatment room or where you store all of their kit.

    Your local authority will assess your home and decide if you qualify for a reduction in your council tax.

    Single Person’s Discount, Who Counts?

    Council tax bills assume that there are at least two adults in the household. If only one adult is ‘visible’ then you qualify for a 25% discount.

Top Tips...

• Call your LA and ask them to send you details of their schemes.

• Talk to your disability social worker about what you might be able to be eligible for. They may have more local information.

• Take notes when to talk to your Local Authority on the phone and if you’re not sure, write down when you both chatted about and email it to them to check your details are right.

Here is a list of people that may not be counted as ‘visible’.

  • Please contact your Council Tax department for a complete list in your area.
  • Children under 18 years of age
  • People aged 18/19 years of age for whom Child Benefit is payable
  • They can then be counted as ‘invisible’ until 31 October of that year
  • Full time students, most apprentices and trainees aged under 25
  • Anyone who has a ‘severe mental impairment’, for example learning disabilities or are on the autistic spectrum. They must also get a disability benefit like DLA or PIPs.
  • Some live-in care workers providing care on behalf of an LA or charity. It also includes some carers providing at least 35 hours of care a week to someone who claims:

    • Attendance Allowance at either rate (only the high rate in Scotland)

    • Disability Living Allowance care component at the middle or high rate (only the high rate in Scotland)

    • Personal Independence Payment daily living component at either rate (only the enhanced rate in Scotland)

    PLEASE NOTE that you do count if you are caring for your child under 18 years of age.

Low Income and Hardship Funds

Each council reviews and decides on what level of income qualifies. That means that each scheme can be different and change each year so check with your local council annually to see if you qualify. Most local authorities run hardship funds. Even if they don’t you can still request extra help. A council has the power to make discretionary payments in individual cases.

More financial help

Find out about grants, benefits and other help for you and your family.

Personal Budgets

Find out about personal budgets, if you're eligible and how to apply.

Tax Credits

Find tonnes of information about the extra amount you should be getting if your child is disabled and you get child tax credits.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

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Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Personal Budgets

Personal Budgets

What is a Personal Budget?

Personal budgets are an amount of money given by your Local Authority to provide support that’s been identified in your child’s Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP).

The personal budget is used to help your child’s individual needs and help them live more independent lives. You may be able to use it so a carer can take your child to Scouts, the cinema, out shopping, to help with personal care or to come along with you and help you while on holiday.

How do I get a Personal Budget for my Child?

Contact your Local Authority’s disability social worker team to get the ball rolling or ask to speak to someone at your LA who deals specifically with direct payments. Your local Authority will then carry out a needs assessment to get a clear picture of what your individual family needs.

Before your assessment think about...

  • What sort of help do you need?
  • How does your child’s disability/health affect them and your wholefamily?
  • What are you having trouble with at the moment?
  • How could your child have more control over their life?
  • Do your/their needs change?
  • How much help do you need and how often?
  • What do you imagine could change if you had the help?

You could ask for help to do the following...

  • Getting in or out of bed, washing, toileting, dressing
  • Playing outdoors, clubs, leisure or educational activities.
  • Shopping
  • Respite care or short breaks
  • Cooking
  • Socialising including going to events or places of worship

Top tips...

  • Find out what your local council’ s assessment criteria is before your first meeting.
  • Take notes during the assessment.
  • Ask what help your LA gives in order to manage your budget.

 Different ways to Manage your Personal Budget

Your Local Authority will give you loads of information and help about what options they offer and which way or combinations of ways you can get your direct payments.

Direct payments – your local council pays some or all of your budget into a bank account managed by you or someone else who will manage the budget for you like a broker.

An account managed by the council...indirect payments – the council will manage your budget and will sort out services on your behalf.

As an Individual Service Fund (ISF) – Your local authority pays an organization that provides support services and will follow your instructions in getting the services you need. You have a say as to how this support is provided.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Disabled Child Tax Credits

On this page you’ll find tonnes of information about the extra amount you should be getting if your child is disabled and you get child tax credits. 

This is not an automatic payment, so you must let the Child Tax Office know if you think you're eligible.

Don’t forget to check out our other Sky Badger pages to find out about other benefits for disabled children as well as grants, respite care and much more.

Quick Links

If you want to jump straight to the section that's relevant for you then use these quick links.

Child Tax Credits

What is the Disability Child Tax Credit?

You’ll already be getting child tax credits if you have a child under 16 or under 20 in eligible education or training. If your child is disabled, you should be getting extra help.

You may get extra Child Tax Credits if your child either gets Disability Living Allowance or PIPs.

What is the Disabled Child Element?

The disabled child element is an extra amount that is added into your child tax credits award.

The disabled child rate

A child or young person qualifies for the disabled child rate if they get:

  • any other rate of DLA or PIP or
    are certified as severely sight impaired or blind by a consultant ophthalmologist, or have ceased to be so certified in the past 28 weeks.

The severely disabled child rate 

A child or young person qualifies for the severely disabled child rate if they get:

  • DLA highest rate care component
  • PIP enhanced rate daily living component
Personal Budgets

Contact A Family

Guide to Tax Credits

Revenue Benefits

Understanding Tax Credits

Qualifying for the Disability Component

To qualify for the extra disability component, your child must….

       The disabled child rate

        A child or young person qualifies for             the disabled child rate if they get...

  • any other rate of DLA or PIP or
  • are certified as severely sight impaired or blind by a consultant ophthalmologist, or have ceased to be so certified in the past 28 weeks.

    The severely disabled child rate

    A child or young person qualifies for the severely disabled child rate if they get...

  • DLA highest rate care component
  • PIP enhanced rate daily living component

Does it matter how much I earn?

Your income will affect how much Tax Credit you get. Contact the Tax Credit advice line to check out where you stand.

Boy in the theme of  summer time .

Disabled Child Tax Credits Rates & Entitlements

This comes in two parts, the disabled child rate and the severely disabled child rate.

Disabled Child Tax Credits Weekly Rates

Disabled Child Rate £60
Severely Disabled Child Rate £24 (additional)

How do I Apply?

YOU HAVE TO TELL THE TAX CREDIT OFFICE YOURSELF!

You won’t get this extra payment automatically so give them a ring now....

 

Contact: Tax Credits Office 0345 300 3900.

Other things that might help you…

You should also check out the Sky Badger website to see if you can claim carer’s allowance, young carer’s support, help with your bills, Council tax reductions and much more.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Carers Allowance

On this page you’ll find tonnes of information about Carer's Allowance. What is Carer's Allowance, How much is Carer's Allowance, find out if you're eligible and how to apply. You can also find out about Carer's Credit so your NI payments stay up to date.

Don’t forget to check out our other Sky Badger pages to find out about other benefits for disabled children as well as grants, respite care and much more.

What is Carer's Allowance?

If you spend 35 hours a week or more caring for a child who gets the middle or higher rate care component DLA then you might be eligible you Caller’s Allowance. You don’t have to be related to, or live with, the child or young person you care for but you won’t be paid extra if you care for more than one disabled child.

Contact the Carer’s Allowance Unit

Telephone: 0345 608 4321

Textphone: 0345 604 5312

Monday to Thursday, 8:30am to 5pm

Friday, 8:30am to 4:30pm

carers allowance

Carers UK

More guides and information.

Turn 2 Us

More information.

Qualifying for Carer's Allowance

Your child must already get one of these benefits...

  • Personal Independence Payment - daily living component
  • Disability Living Allowance - the middle or highest care rate
  • Attendance Allowance
  • Constant Attendance Allowance at or above the normal maximum rate with an Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit

You might be able to get Carer’s Allowance if...

  • you’re 16 or over
  • you spend at least 35 hours a week caring for someone
  • have been in England, Scotland or Wales for at least 2 of the last 3 years
  • you normally live in England, Scotland or Wales, or you live abroad as a member of the armed forces
  • you’re not in full-time education
  • you’re not studying for 21 hours a week or more
  • you earn no more than £110 a week (after taxes, care costs while you’re at work and 50% of what you pay into your pension) - don’t count your pension as income
  • you’re not subject to immigration control

You might still be eligible if you’re moving to or already living in another EEA country. The rules are different in Northern Ireland.

Effect on the benefits of the person you care for...

When you claim Carer’s Allowance, the person you care for will stop getting:

  • a severe disability premium paid with their benefits
  • an extra amount for severe disability paid with Pension Credit, if they get one
  • Reduced Council Tax - contact their local council to find out if this affects them

Effect on your benefits

When you claim Carer’s Allowance your other benefits may be reduced, but your total benefit payments will usually either go up or stay the same.

Carer’s Allowance doesn’t count towards the benefit cap.

If you get Working Tax Credit or Child Tax Credit, you must contact the Tax Credits office to tell them about Carer’s Allowance claim.

Use a benefits calculator to work out how your other benefits will be affected.

Carer's Allowance Rates & Entitlements

Personal Budgets

Carer's Credit

You could get Carer’s Credit if you’re caring for someone for at least 20 hours a week.

Carer’s Credit is a National Insurance credit that helps with gaps in your National Insurance record. Your State Pension is based on your National Insurance record.

Your income, savings or investments won’t affect eligibility for Carer’s Credit.

What you'll get...

If you’re eligible for Carer’s Credit, you can get credits to help fill gaps in your National Insurance record.

This means you can take on caring responsibilities without affecting your ability to qualify for the State Pension.

Eligibility

To get Carer’s Credit you must be:

  • aged 16 or over
  • under State Pension age
  • looking after one or more people for at least 20 hours a week

The person you’re looking after must get one of the following:

  • Disability Living Allowance care component at the middle or highest rate
  • Attendance Allowance
  • Constant Attendance Allowance

If the person you’re caring for doesn’t get one of these benefits, you may still be able to get Carer’s Credit. When you apply, fill in the ‘Care Certificate’ part of the application form and get a health or social care professional to sign it.

Carers who don’t qualify for Carer’s Allowance may qualify for Carer’s Credit.

Breaks in caring and eligibility

You can still get Carer’s Credit even if you have breaks from caring (up to 12 weeks in a row).

For example, you’ll still get Carer’s Credit for 12 weeks if:

  • you take a short holiday
  • someone you look after goes into hospital
  • you go into hospital

Keep the Carer’s Allowance Unit updated if you have a break in caring of more than 12 weeks in a row.

Other things Carer's Allowance allows you to apply for…

You’ll automatically get National Insurance credits. You might also be able to apply for support from your local council and a Council Tax Reduction.

See Sky Badger's Finance pages for more information on benefits, grants and much more.

Sky Badger can also help you with...

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

istock_000021104923large

Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.