Advocacy

What is Advocacy?

Advocacy

Do you need help to be involved in decisions about your care needs? Or are you a carer of a young person who is about to start using adult services? Finding out about Advocacy is really important so that you or the young person you care for can be heard, understand your choices and make your own decisions.

What can an Advocate do?

Advocacy, Requesting Support in relation to the Care Act

Changes brought in by the Care Act mean that any decisions made by a local authority about your care will consider your well-being and what is important to you so that you can stay healthy and remain as independent as possible. To do this, it is important for you to be fully involved in decisions about your care and support needs.

An advocate can support you to…

  • Understand the assessment process
  • Understand your choices and make your own decisions
  • Tell others what you want and about your views and feelings
  • Help you to challenge a decision if you are not happy with it and
  • Make sure that you get the support you are entitled to.

Who needs advocacy?

You might be able to access advocacy if you are…

  • An adult who needs care and support
  • A carer of an adult
  • A carer of a young person who is about to start using adult services
  • A young person who is about to start using adult services.

And you find it very hard to…

  • Understand what is happening and the choices that you have
  • Decide what care and support you need
  • Tell people what you want
  • You do not have any friends or family available (or who feel able) to support you

Some people who lack capacity to make decisions in relation to their care or residence may already have an advocate appointed for them under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. If they do, it might be possible for the same advocate to be their Care Act advocate too.

Duty to provide advocacy support

Local authorities will be under a duty to provide an independent advocate where an adult may have “substantial difficulty” in doing one of the following…

  • Understanding relevant information
  • Retaining that information
  • Using or weighing up that information
  • Communicating their views, wishes or feelings.

And there is no appropriate person (such as a family member) who can support them.

 

When should an advocate be appointed?

The local authority will have to consider whether somebody has substantial difficulty in understanding matters and whether an advocate is therefore required in a number of scenarios including…

  • Carrying out needs assessments
  • Carrying out carer’s assessments
  • Preparing care and support plans for adults
  • Preparing support plans for carers
  • Revising care and support plans/support plans
  • Carrying out child’s needs assessment
  • Carrying out child’s carer’s assessment; and
  • Carrying out young carer’s assessments.

What happens next?

If a decision is made by a local authority about your care that you are not happy with, your advocate may be able to help. Your advocate can help you write a report about the things you don’t like to ask for the decision to be changed.

The local authority is under a duty to consider any written report from an advocate and respond in writing. It must also consider the advocate’s views when making decisions in relation to the individual in question.

An advocate may also be under a duty to bring legal proceedings on behalf of an individual that they represent, if disputes cannot be resolved with the local authority.

FIND LOADS MORE LEGAL SUPPORT, ADVOCATES & LAWYERS HERE...

Use our directory to find lots of charities and firms that can give you legal advice.

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Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Extra help… In and out of the classroom

Disability Living Allowance Seeing

If you're looking for extra help for a child with SEN, Dyslexia, or on the autistic spectrum you have come to the right place!

What are Special Educational Needs (SEN)?

Your child has Special Educational Needs if they have a difficulty or disability which makes learning harder for them than for other kids their age. It could be anything from dyslexia or dyspraxia, to emotional or social problems.

Levels of help

There are lots of levels of help available to your child, with a statement being right at the top. Have a conversation with your school teacher or SENCO (special educational needs co-ordinator) for advice on the level your child needs.

The educational support process is like a staircase, and your child can only move up one step at a time, if it is clear that they are not making progress with the current level of support. It can take time to get them the right support, so hang in there, and be patient.

Gifted?

Your child also might have SEN and be gifted in another way. This is called Dual or Multiple Exceptionality. You can find out more with some brilliant factsheets from the National Association for Gifted Children about supporting gifted kids with additional needs.

Extra help

You can get extra help if your child is affected by...

  • a lengthy stays in hospital
  • mobility issues around their school
  • or sight or hearing problems that prevent them from fully accessing the curriculum.

People You'll meet...THERAPISTS & EDUCATIONAL PROFESSIONALS

While your child goes through diagnosis and treatment, you may come across some specialist therapists and professionals. Here is our handy guide to the types of professionals that are there to support your child and what they do.

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Browse loads more help at school

Our directory is crammed with amazing organisations who can help with all aspects of your child's education.

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Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Top 10 gifts for kids with autism

Top 10 Toys to help kids with autism learn and play

From the four corners of the internet, Sky Badger has hunted out these  fabulous gems just for you. So if you have a child with autism and you're looking to find gadgets and cool stuff to help them at school or play, then you've come to the right place!

autism toys

1. STRETCHY APPLE & WORMS

STRETCHY APPLE & WORMS

10/10

A must have. What a fun fiddle thing! Excellent to pop in your bag when you need to relieve your child's stress or anxiety levels.

£5.45

2. Picture Exchange Communication Keyring

Early Years Activities Picture Exchange Communication Keyring

8/10

A really useful way to help communication. 10 tiles 6cm x 6cm with these cute pictures and all on a handy little keyring to attach to your child's school backpack. Other cards available cover subjects like activities and out and about actions.

£3.50

3. Boing Pro

8/10

Rubbery light-filled ball, every time it's squeezed it changes colour. A very groovy fiddle thing indeed!

 

£12.99

4. Sensory LED Light up Drawing/writing Board

Sensory LED Light up Drawing/writing Board

9/10

This is an exceptional drawing board. A serious bit of sensory kit. A little on the big present side of things but a great investment.

Colour changing/flashing and static light settings all at the press of the remote control. Accessories included: Pack of 8 pens, Cleaning Cloth, Hanging chain, Remote control and Power cable.

£34.99

5. Fidget Pencils

Fidget Pencil

9/10

Some ideas you wish you'd thought of first...this is one of them! These colourful pencils come with four different tops, such as a nut and bolt, and are great at occupying busy fingers and allow our kids to focus their minds.

£9.50

6. 1000 Glow In The Dark Stars

1000 Glow In The Dark Stars

9/10

Magical.1000 glow in the dark star and cosmic shape stickers. These will cover any room with indiscreet glowing stars that when exposed to light for a few minutes will glow for up to an hour. These stars make falling asleep a glorious time to fill up those perfect bed time memories for you and your little one.

£4.99

7. Large Puffer "Furb" Ball

Large Puffer "Furb" Ball

9/10

This cool balloon thingy has lovely bright colours and a soft rubber feel, making it an excellent toy for kids to fiddle with and it stimulates their senses.

£7.95

8. Worry Eater Flamm

Worry Eater Flamm

8/10

This exceedingly groovy plush characters are more than toys. They are ideal for helping our little ones articulate specific anxieties and ask for help to overcome them. Children can write down or draw a specific fear or worry on a piece of paper, place it in one of these furry little characters and zip up the mouth. Lots of different 'monsters' are available in loads of different sizes...from 5' to keyring size!

£19.98

9. Glow Disco Duck

Glow Disco Duck

8/10

This very well might take the edge ff stressful bath times. No ordinary bath toy, float Disco Duck in your bath water and watch him burst into life! This quirky rubber ducks looks are deceiving as once he comes into contact with water, Disco Duck glows from within with a fabulous colour changing light show. Colours phase gently into one another before moving into a funky flash disco mode before returning back to its more relaxing mode. Also he glows in the dark so don't get a shock!

£5.95

10. Jointed Monster

Jointed Monster

9/10

And finally..These wooden monsters have movable heads and feet and are chunky to fidget with...what fun!

Size: 55mm x 30mm x 120mm high

£10.25

Browse loads of other sensory toy suppliers here...

Use our directory to find lots of companies who supply sensory toys and kit.

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LOST IN TRANSITION – PART 16

Real Genius

GCSE results

Results day. I know I should be pleased for them. I should say “well done” to all the children of my friends that I’ve watched grow up with Max. I’m trying, promise. But the wild gushing of how incredibly bright they are, how hard they worked, how much they deserve their 15 A*s. Well, do you know what? I’m not proud of them, I’m green eyed with furious envy.

You see, my Max sat his exams this year too. Actually, that’s exam in the singular but that’s another story. He studied, he revised. He threw himself into the subject with everything he’s got and he failed spectacularly. He was always going to fail, I knew that too but there is something deep down that feels unfair about how hard he tried. The fact is that in order for people to get A’s there must be others that get C’s or fails. I just didn’t want it to be him, he could do with a win. He’s only 16 and his life has been so damn hard. I wonder how many other mums have spent time today with fixed smiles on their devastated faces? How many of their friends simply forgot that their children also sat a couple of exams? How many chose not to ask?

It’s all a bit ridiculous I know. But when our children were little and we heard the news for the first time that all was not well, we began to live a day at a time. We lurch to the next seizure, the next time they walk into a road without looking, the next MRI the next set of ECG results…fingers crossed every night as you fall asleep. Odd, but at the time, you don’t think about your little one never learning to read properly, never going out on the town with their mates (if they have any) or getting to GCSE results day knowing you’ll pretend the day isn’t happening.

Of course, it doesn’t end there. This is just the beginning of a much longer journey. No conversations about which university courses they’re interested in or what they’re going to do during their gap year while travelling around India. Instead its talk of if your local authority will continue funding their special needs 6th form that you nearly killed yourself fighting to get him into and then will he be able to get a job? How are his medical needs going to be supported? Will he ever leave home? Will he be lonely? Scared? Will bad people take advantage of him? Can I keep him safe?...I’m just so incredibly scared.

“If at first you don’t succeed, lower your life expectations.”

That used to be a lot funnier.

BUT....self-pity is terribly unattractive. Instead, I shall probably wallow for a little longer then pull myself together. I have to focus on this being his journey and it mustn’t be measured against other people’s journeys. Like all of our original children, they will hopefully grow up to be original adults. It has to be our job to take these ridiculous exam feelings and put them in a box, burry the box at the bottom of a lake then napalm the lake.

Big deal that other kids got 15 A*s today. Are they seriously going to grow up happier than Max? Will their lemon meringue pies make eyes roll in glee like his do?

So, stuff you world and the way you decide to measure success in my beautiful boy. That world can go spin. I’ll have another piece of pie thank you very much.

If you’re in the same place, you might want to check out these useful links…

IPSEA - https://www.ipsea.org.uk

Preparing for Adulthood- http://www.preparingforadulthood.org.uk

Sky Badger can also help you with...

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Education

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Finances

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Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

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Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.

Lost in Transition – part 12

Grange Hill

When I was growing up, Grange Hill was what a state comprehensive school was all about. That sausage, Zammo and Ro-LAND were my anti-heroes. Now, (a horrific 30 years later) my two strapping mini-men are both at a state Comprehensive School....but this one is different.

I think a lot of it comes down to the support they’ve both had. Obviously, Max needs a huge amount of medical support but it’s the communication help that’s made all the difference. The speech therapists, the OT, the constant encouragement academically and socially. The school even runs a board games club that (without any pressure) helps build turn taking skills and helps Max work on his small talk.

You have to understand where Max came from to get how big this is. Max went from being pretty much non-verbal in yr. 7 to in yr. 11 sitting exams, having a girlfriend, done his bronze DofE, going to college and he’s just been approved to do the NCS over the Summer.

The school has a sibling group too. My youngest found Max’s needs really hard to cope with and he still does if I’m honest. But knowing that other friends at school are in the same boat in having brothers and sisters with special needs was life changing to him. After that first sibling group meeting it was as if he exhaled for the first time in years. In the last year, he’s gradually came out of his shell. He’s become less angry and found that he does like some lessons. He got into sport in a big was and now does squash, tennis, rugby, climbing and fencing. He got his bronze award last night!

I know mums do this annoying bragging stuff on FB all the time but my two have had some extraordinarily tough times. They haven't always done well, been well mentally or physically, fitted in or even been that happy at times. Getting them into the right school might just be the very best thing I've ever done for either of them.

So why am I telling you this? Well, because I’ve made a tonne of mistakes. I kept them both in schools that were not right for them because I was scared to make a fuss. I didn’t ask the questions I should have, I took ‘professionals’ word as gospel even when I knew something was wrong. I was so afraid of not being liked, scared that ‘professional’ would think I was crazy or difficult.

The school they now attend has made an enormous difference to who they could become…I worked for my two so why don’t you suggest your child’s school starts a games club? Or offers the DofE to their SEN student? Or starts up a sibling club?

Become a pain in the arse, get things moving. For what it’s worth, I don’t care what ‘professionals’ think about me anymore. I will be as difficult and crazy as I need to be to make absolutely sure that my two get the best chances they can. Because when I do my best, they seem to fly. They have this strength, a kind of internal generator that pushes them onto bigger and better things. I can't tell them any of this obviously but I don't think I'll ever give up the hugs at the school gate even though they are bigger than me. They are my new heroes and I hope they know it.

 

If you’re in the same place, you might want to check out these useful links…

The National Autistic Societyhttp://www.autism.org.uk

Epilepsy Action - https://www.epilepsy.org.uk

Duke of Edinburgh Awards – SEN support

http://www.dofe.info/go/additionalneeds/

National Citizen Awards - http://www.ncsyes.co.uk/summer?gclid=Cj0KEQjw6-PJBRCO_br1qoOB4LABEiQAEkqcVZSGfXbrVy5PzJNblpdaAR-gZKsptFVxtV-w3QXz98UaApeY8P8HAQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

 

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Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Lost in Transition – part 10

cake

Rear Window

It had been decided by the great and the good that the only way Bob’s Community College could decide if they could offer him a place was to observe him for a whole day in his natural habitat at school. The day was set for a Tuesday so Mrs. Bob from the College could also observe Max in his weekly after school cookery club.

Mrs. Bob from Bob’s Community College arrived bright and early. Of course I had no idea what was happening in Max’s classroom, just that it was happening. The email from the Transition Officer had clearly stated that,

“…they were not trying to catch anyone out…”

What? Were they?

It hadn’t even occurred to me that might be the case. What were they trying to catch us out with? What was there to figure out? All I knew was that Max was never going to get the math he needed to do cookery at a mainstream college and none of the special needs colleges did cookery. It sounded like we were waiting for the tagline at the end of a joke but it wasn’t at all funny.

Max took his usual place in his own little kitchen in the cookery classroom

He worked through the directions making the pastry, chilling it, peeling the apples. He worked alone of course but I don’t think he noticed he was. I hope he didn’t notice anyway. Most of all I hoped he wasn’t lonely.

I tried not to watch him cook of course, but I was. Mrs. Bob took her seat opposite me surrounded by chairs stacked neatly on top of tables (it was an afterschool club after all). She dismounted one of the blue plastic chairs and got her notepad out with a smile…

”You don’t mind if I sit here do you?”

Actually you frighten me, I thought, but...

“Of course, fab to have the company.”

I shut my laptop, tonnes of work to do too.

So much was riding on this one day...

If Mrs Bob thought Max’s culinary future was simply a hopeful parental dream, then Bob’s Community College would offer him a place without the cookery component. If Mrs Bob felt Max could handle level 2 math, then he could attend the mainstream cookery course at Bob’s Community College too. She kept taking notes and in-between each thought she clicked the top of her biro endlessly, constantly. What could she possibly still be writing about?

She’d been observing Max since 9am...

We chatted. The usual SEN small talk, games of SENdar in playgrounds, ASD eye contact, playing next to not with. It was like SEN dating small talk. An unwritten code of how to talk to SEN types. I kept noticing Max struggling with the right-handed apple peeler…He’s a lefty.

She talked about her family, how her son played golf and tennis right-handed but was in fact left handed. She’d noticed Max struggle with that bloody apple peeler. Then she said it…

”Max is doing all of this by himself isn’t he?”

By George she’s got it! Yup, that’s just how my baby boy rolls lady.

“I haven’t seen him this engaged or independent all day…”

Said Mrs Bob. I know! Seriously what have we been talking about for the last 3 months.

“Really?”

I said, I can’t actually pull off coy, but I tried anyway...

“So what do you you think he’ll do after college?”

An ungainly loaded question I thought.

“Well, I don’t see why he can’t get a job in a kitchen somewhere…”

She would make a terrible poker player, her left eyebrow shot up as she continued to scribble.

“Do you mean some kind of assisted work experience?”

No, an actual job, like a real person you crazy...

“No, just a job. Well if a couple of other people there are trained in the epilepsy stuff and I can get him help to get to and from work then I can’t see why he can’t work…”

“But he can’t do the maths can he? He won’t be able to do any of the measuring?”

What for washing up? Beating the hell out of some bread dough or perhaps even making sandwiches? Really?

“I don’t think all kitchen jobs need maths all the time. That kind of seems like a rather small obstacle to overcome in the big picture don’t you think?”

She smiled and continued to click the top of her pen…click…click…click. Terrible handwriting too. Mrs. Bob finally stopped the constant clicking of that freebie marketing biro and packed up her lined A4 pad into her plastic folder with a satisfying pop.

“I’ll get my report over to Miss Bob by the end of the week.”

Transition officer Miss Bob that is.

And there it was. Almost going unnoticed, a little wry smile...

A tiny ‘woman to woman’ moment. I can’t be sure it even happened and I’ll let you all know if this all works out but I think she got it. I think she could image Max training, him working, him living happily ever after. We’ll see. I won’t exhale just yet.

 

If you’re in the same place, you might want to check out these useful links…

The Children and Families Act 2014 - http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2014/6/pdfs/ukpga_20140006_en.pdf

The Equalities Act 2010 - https://www.gov.uk/guidance/equality-act-2010-guidance

IPSEA - https://www.ipsea.org.uk

Preparing for Adulthood- http://www.preparingforadulthood.org.uk

Lost in Transition – Part 7

Much Ado About Nothing

You must first understand how wildly damaged I am. I have this horrible habit of not stopping, not giving up, ever. When I was a kid I lived in London and would always run for every bus, every train. I found myself getting really anxious if I didn’t. There is a simple explanation. If I always did my best, then if it didn’t work out I didn’t have to blame myself.

It’s a pretty naive idea but it’s stayed with me. Now when I work I get horribly obsessed. I won’t sleep until I’m done. And to be done I have to go above and beyond. Max’s transition is under my skin in the same way.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Contacting the shortlisted schools for more information was going to be a minefield.

So I did the only thing I could think of and got all grown up about it. I structured the questions based on some ‘fun’ bedtime reading namely The Children and Families Act 2014 and The Equalities Act 2010. The letters were formal, enormous and incredibly detailed.

I waited…then I waited some more. I got two responses after a week,

Thank you for your email requesting details regarding our post 16 provision for your son. Unfortunately we cannot provide for many of the requirements, therefore I have to regretfully say that we would not be an appropriate provision for him. If you need any further details regarding which aspects we could / could not provide then please do come back to me.”

The other school answered each question in the same amount of detail I’d sent them. They were surprisingly kind and open, they seemed to see him as a person. For the first time I felt as if Max’s promise might be able to be kept.

OK, one yes and one no. I sent out reminders to the other five schools through their main emails as well as the SEN department ones. I got two responses from PAs saying they would pass my message on. They either didn’t or the departments in question didn’t want to respond.

Instead I spent my time pouring over the school’s websites in shocking detail. Two felt right. I know, a terrible thing to trust your gut instinct but there was something that felt personal about these two. Less cattle like, they felt as if they were aiming at their kids having a future and weren’t looking at warehousing them. They didn’t’ even use the word ‘cohort’ in their about page.

I chatted to Miss Bob, Max’s Transition officer, about it and she arranged to speak to the rest herself. She has suggested visits and assessments. She wants more paperwork from Max’s school, from Max’s doctors, from his carers…it's endless. But at least it’s something I can get my teeth into.

 

If you’re in the same place, you might want to check out these useful links…

The Children and Families Act 2014 - http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2014/6/pdfs/ukpga_20140006_en.pdf

The Equalities Act 2010 - https://www.gov.uk/guidance/equality-act-2010-guidance

IPSEA - https://www.ipsea.org.uk

Preparing for Adulthood- http://www.preparingforadulthood.org.uk

What can you do if your child’s application for assessment is turned down?

Disability Living Allowance Dressing

If you're dealing with special needs tribunal or an assessment of special educational needs...Get advice and help here.

There is a lot of free professional advice available throughout the whole of the UK. There are also a lot of advocates and solicitors that specialise in SEN. We suggest you talk about costs right at the outset.  Time is of the essence. Just like the application process there are tight deadlines to appeal decisions. You also have to wait a certain amount of time before you can reapply. Some things are out of your control – sadly, the chances of success vary wildly depending on your local authority and how much funding they have left in the kitty. Have a look through these guidance notes: Special Educational Needs and Disability appeals (HM Courts & Tribunals Service)

If you take professional or free expert help, we still suggest you get every document emailed, acknowledged, time stamped and sent to your home address as a hard copy.

 

Here is a template letter for parents who have been refused an assessment

Every Disabled Child Matters, in association with Irwin Mitchell Solicitors.

Douglas Silas Solicitors

Everything you wanted to know about the law on special educational needs but were too afraid to ask.

l change in the way that education, health and social care professionals work with families and young people.

Detailed advice about the EHCPs

Use our directory to find lots of organisations and charities with detailed advice

Can we help you with anything else?

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Education

Find extra help at school, information about Education, Health, Care Plans (EHCP), apps & programmes, tech and IT for supporting learning and sensory activities.

disabled holidays uk

Holidays & Free time

Find holidays, sports, free cinema tickets, theatre, clubs, art, dance, music, days out, make a wish charities and more.

gwvmbgpp-pq-steinar-la-engeland

Useful technology & kit

Find sensory toys, useful technology, trikes and bikes, wheelchairs & mobility.

disabled grants

Finances

Find grants, governemnt benefits and help with your utility and council tax bills.

oqmzwnd3thu-helloquence

Legal stuff

Find out about disability rights, educational and medical law and how to find a specialist advocate or lawyer.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Medical stuff

Find information about your child's medical condition, medicines that they take and mental health support.

Not sure where to turn?

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What is an Education, Health & Care Plan (EHC plan or EHCP)?

The Education Health and Care Plan (E.H.C.P.) or E.H.C plan, is an exciting new system that puts you and your child at the very centre of the assessment and planning process. It is designed to make sure that your views are not only heard but also understood.

This is called 'person centred planning' because it  increases your choice and control. This new process focuses on what is important for children and young people. Thats because you know what you and your child want to achieve now and in the future. Young people and families have helped to design the plan.

The E.H.C.P. is designed to create a real change in the way that education, health and social care professionals work with families and young people.

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Who is an EHCP for?

The educational health and care plan is for children and young people who have special educational needs (SENs) and/or disabilities. Your child’s needs will be assessed by education, health and social care professionals to see if you should have a EHC plan. You can talk to your child’s school, college or nursery about eligibility for an assessment. For example, your school’s special educational needs coordinator (SENco) will be able to help.

So how does it work?

At the start of the assessment, you and your child will get the chance to say what’s working, what’s not working and what you think needs to change. Your school and LA will help you with this because a great plan can theoretically mean great change for your child!

At the same time  information will be gathered from the other people working with your child and a meeting will be arranged. At this meeting you can figure out outcomes and how you think they can best be met.

Remember that this is all about a partnership between you and the professionals involved to make the right decisions for you as a family.

Near the end of the assessment time, the multi-agency group will meet again to confirm the EHCP. They will decide what support you might be eligible for to meet your agreed outcomes. The plan will be clear about how much things cost and will have agreed timescales. This will  make sure that your child's plan is updated and reviewed regularly. That's really important so that any changes in their condition or development can be supported. The plan will then go with your child or the young person as they change services, change schools and also when they leave school and go on to college, training or employment.

The EHCP is designed to create a real change in the way that education, health and social care professionals work with families and young people.

How might this affect the support my child gets?

The EHCP assessment and planning is designed to focus on agreeing individual outcomes and the support needed to achieve these. The plan  will be tailored to each child's needs. This could include helping families to make best use of support available. These might include services available in the local offer, from the local community, or provided by statutory services.

Sky Badger knows that finding help is tricky, so please look through Sky Badger's website to find even more support for your whole family.

What age does an EHC Plan cover?

An EHC Plan covers disabled and SEN children and young adults aged 0-25

How long does it take?

The whole process lasts 20 weeks.

When Do EHC Plans Come In?

EHC plans start to come in from September 2014 and will be rolled out in phases over the next 2/3 years.

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Detailed advice about the EHCPs

Use our directory to find lots of organisations and charities with detailed advice

What can you do if your child’s application for assessment or EHCP is turned down? ...Get advice and help here.

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Contact our helpdesk

Do you need specific help for your disabled or special needs child? Click here to tell us more about what you're looking for and our helpdesk team will do their very best to find you what you need. All of our advice is confidential and we will not share your details or personal information with anyone.